Logan Lucky

It would have been my brother’s birthday if he had survived the cancer.  I listened to Jane Pauley on CBS Sunday Morning talking about her summer vacation simply taking it easy doing the laundry and resting.  I sat in the plaza watching the students getting ready for the fall semester, and then I took the buses into Emeryville to catch an early movie.  I wanted an Icee, but they didn’t seem to have the special anniversary cups that I sought, so I passed on that.  I bought a ticket for “Logan Lucky,” a movie directed by Steven Soderbergh.  I thought I detected traces of “Big Deal on Madonna Street,” “Little Miss Sunshine,” and “The Killing” in this movie.  Channing Tatum is the father who loses his job and plans a heist of a NASCAR event that involves Daniel Craig as an explosives expert who was very unlike James Bond.  I found it somewhat hard to believe in Channing playing someone whose favorite song is John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.”  Adam Driver is Channing’s brother, and he has one-arm, which isn’t a requirement in a heist movie, but it gives the sense of something like “The Fugitive.”  Katie Holmes is in the cast, and she has aged a bit from the first days that I remember her.  The movie made me think of Billy Bob Thornton’s comment that “Smokey and the Bandit” was a documentary of the South.  The son of Meg Ryan and Dennis Quaid is in the movie, although I thought he was that guy who was the Amazing Spider-Man.  Seth MacFarlane is a person who threatens to blow the whole caper as he encounters the brothers and gets into a fight.  One of the funny things is that except for the car ride to the speedway, everything proceeds at such a calm pace that the robbery seems to be happening in another universe, unless the South is not really another universe.  With so many people in on the job, I wondered if each person’s cut was more than one dollar.  I thought this was an amusing movie.  I have never seen any of Soderbergh’s Oceans movies.  I know him from films like “Sex, Lies, and Videotape” and “Traffic.”  He has made some worthy movies in his career.  “Logan Lucky” isn’t a brilliant movie, but it’s better than many of the movies I saw this summer.  As I left the theatre fiddling with my phone, I read the news that Jerry Lewis had died.  His movies meant a lot to me when I was a kid.  I thought he was hilarious as I watched his movies on television.  I think I’ll remember him most for “The Bellboy,” “The Ladies Man,” and “The Nutty Professor.”  It was sad that he died just before Labor Day this year, as I saw him so many times on those holidays.  The world seems like a frightening place now that Jerry Lewis is gone forever.  I thought one of his greatest performances was in Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy.”  I listened to the end of the A’s game in Houston as I headed home.  They scored three runs with no RBI, and Blake Treinen pitched two innings to get the save of the 3-2 win.  I checked the record store for used copies of Jerry Lewis movies but didn’t find any.  I listened to Robert Hilburn’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Times radio program on KCSN.  He played songs from the Stax label, by Otis Redding, Sam and Dave, The Dramatics, and Carla Thomas.  I enjoyed the hour and the songs like “Try a Little Tenderness,” “Soul Man,” and “B-A-B-Y.”  I thought about taking BART to an area that wasn’t cloudy in the morning so that I could get a view of the eclipse.  Three of the people who died on August 21 were Leon Trotsky (1940), Ernest Thayer (1940) and Robert Moog (2005).  Today is a birthday for Kim Cattrall (61) and Kenny Rogers (79).

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Derek Carr’s Two Touchdown Passes

I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on August 19, 1978 were “An Everlasting Love,” “Magnet and Steel,” “Copacabana,” “Love Will Find a Way,” “Boogie Oogie Oogie,” “Hot Blooded,” “Miss You,” “Last Dance,” “Grease,” and “Three Times a Lady.”  I went to work for a five-hour shift.  I was given a pair of glasses to view the eclipse.  I left after my shift and browsed through the record store, where I bought a Criterion Collection Blu-ray copy of “The 400 Blows.”  I walked over to the BART station, where I caught the train to the Coliseum.  The gate that was marked on my ticket as my entrance was closed, so I had to walked to a different place.  I looked through the team store briefly before taking my seat.  Some of the same characters from previous years were back, although the father and son who sat to my left weren’t there for this game.  We weren’t getting the other football games on the video screen.  I saw that the Rams were wearing blue and white jerseys that were almost like the days of Roman Gabriel and Deacon Jones.  I watched the Raiders cheerleaders, and I recognized only a few from last year.  One of the men who lit the torch started off as a ball boy back in 1968 and hasn’t missed a home game since then.  I had to wonder whether he’s going to move to Las Vegas.  The Raiders’ defense was introduced.  I couldn’t see Marshawn Lynch during the national anthem, although I saw the photographers near the bench.  Jared Goff looked like a better quarterback than he was last year, and Derek Carr was also very good but for one play.  Carr’s first touchdown pass was to Lee Smith.  Carr completed seven of nine passes, although one of those incomplete passes led to a Rams touchdown.  Lynch carried the ball only two times for ten yards.  Carr threw a second touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree, although Crabtree worked to get to the end zone.  The Rams kicked a late field goal to end the first half ahead, 17-14.  We saw a young girl trying to answer trivia questions about the Raiders and Rams.  The questions were hard, so I wondered if they wanted to give away the prize.  Some kids took the field during halftime, playing for teams like the Junior Raiders, the Falcons, and the Broncos.  The third quarter was not too thrilling, as both teams punted three times, and there was no scoring.  Connor Cook threw a touchdown pass to Johnny Holton late in the game to put the Raiders ahead, 21-17, but the Rams came back, helped out by a holding penalty, going ahead with 1:11 left on the clock.  That was the final score.  At one point, we were shown highlights from December 18, 1982, with Jim Plunkett, Cliff Branch, and Marcus Allen making the plays in a 37-31 win.  It was rather hard to believe that it was 35 years ago.  I heard Lincoln Kennedy say on the radio that he liked the infield dirt on the field because it gave the opposing players trouble.  I saw only one fan wearing a shirt that said anything about Las Vegas.  I thought that the attendance was pretty good for a meaningless game with the depressing news about the future of the team, although there were empty seats in the third deck.  It was a bit cold as I left the stadium.  I listened to the radio announcers, and the consensus was that the Raiders’ offense should have a good season, but the defense needs work.  Tom Flores had difficult saying Marshawn’s name.  I heard the end of Chris Townsend’s show, with the last caller angry about the Las Vegas move.  Townsend said that Mark Davis was being a team player with the agreement to play in Mexico City, which helped him get the votes for approval for the move.  Townsend also said that things would get uglier as the time of the move approaches.  I heard about the death of Dick Gregory.  Some of the people who died on August 20 include Kim Stanley (2001), Gene Upshaw (2008), Phyllis Diller (2012), Elmore Leonard (2013), and Melody Patterson (2015).  Today is a birthday for Amy Adams (43), Al Roker (63), Robert Plant (69), Connie Chung (71), and Don King (86).

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Wings

 

I went out to sit through more meetings and to pick up one of my textbooks.  I had eggs and orange juice for breakfast, and a chicken sandwich for lunch.  I left just before 2:30 so that I could make my way to the Grand Lake Theatre to see “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets” again.  The movie didn’t impress me the first time, but I’ve come to like it a bit more.  The Valerian character wasn’t too likable, and the princess didn’t seem to influence him too much.  The sequence with Rihanna seemed unnecessary and made the movie run too long, but Besson couldn’t leave it out.  The dedication to his father was rather funny, because this wasn’t a great film, although there was effort behind it.  I received a message from the AMC Theatres telling me about special Icee cups, making me want to go to Emeryville on Sunday.  It was six o’clock when I left the theatre.  I decided that I should do my laundry.  I saw a few minutes of Adam West on The Big Bang Theory, and I watched the Partridge Family episode “Whatever Happened to Moby Dick?”  Howard Cosell was in it, and Shirley sang lead for one of the few times in the show.  It was interesting to look back on this episode in light of recent controversies about killer whales in places like Marineland.  I watched “Wings,” the first move to win the Best Picture Oscar.  Clara Bow was one of the stars.  I wouldn’t describe her as any sort of brilliant actress, and I wouldn’t say that William Wellman had a great touch with romance scenes.  This is the kind of movie where two characters can become friends after fighting each other, along the lines of John Ford or maybe William Wyler, in my memory.  Gary Cooper is in the film as a character named White, although his appearance is brief.  His view of his possible death in war is that you can’t do anything about it when your time comes.  He’s not superstitious, like the others.  I thought about Bob Melvin as I saw this scene.  I’ve always liked the footage of the planes.  Some of the stunts looked incredibly dangerous.  I didn’t like the bits of color tint.  The last time I saw it used effectively was the pink smoke in “High and Low.”  The disc had two soundtracks, and I listened to the one with sound effects.  The print looked good for a silent film from 1927.  I’ve never thought of this as a great silent film, but I always enjoyed it.  It was interesting to think about it again after “Wonder Woman” and “Dunkirk” this year.  It’s been ninety years since this movie was released, and it does feel like a piece of history at this point.  Wellman did write one of the great movie books.  I would come to remember Gary Cooper for movies like “High Noon,” “Meet John Doe,” and “Ball of Fire.”  I believe I first saw this movie on VHS, so it was good to see it in a different format, as “Brigsby Bear” this week reminded me.  I had a dream that I was teaching one of my classes, and we took the lecture outdoors, but we got rained on.  I saw some of the news coming from Barcelona.  Some of the people who died on August 19 include Blaise Pascal (1662), Groucho Marx (1977), Hayden Rorke (1987), Linus Pauling (1994), and Betty Everett (2012).  Today is a birthday for Kyra Sedgwick (52), Peter Gallagher (62), and Bill Clinton (71).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for August 19, Groucho Marx did at age 86 in Los Angeles in 1977.  In 1988, “Married to the Mob,” starring Michelle Pfeiffer, was released.  Also in 1988, “A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master” was released.  In 1993, Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger were married in East Hampton, New York.

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Columbus

I went to a meeting as preparation for the new school term.  They had box lunch, and I took the chicken salad sandwich.  The bread was soggy.  I left on the 1 bus and, as I still had some time left in the afternoon, I went to the theatre to see “Columbus.”  The principals were John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson, with Parker Posey and Rory Culkin also in the cast.  Cho is Jin, a man whose father is in the hospital, and Richardson is Casey, a library worker with an interest in architecture.  This is taking place in Columbus, Indiana.  Jin and Casey do a lot of talking about their lives, although not quite like “My Dinner with Andre.”  The movie was reminiscent of “Paterson.”  Actually, I read the Ozu and “Tokyo Story” in particular was an influence.  One of the interesting shots is what looked like a brick wall in the sky.  Buildings do make this film looking interesting.  It was better than just shooting houses and streets.  I couldn’t take Cho seriously as an actor, and when Jin gave advice to Casey, I nearly wanted to laugh.  I could identity with Casey’s job in the library because I’ve done similar things for my paychecks.  I wasn’t sure she was replacing the magazines into their bins correctly.  One of her co-workers looked familiar, as his name was Culkin.  He claimed that an M.L.S. was not a good graduate degree to get, even though it could have helped Casey out tremendously.  The story isn’t much, as we’re waiting to see what happens to Jin’s father and Casey’s mother.  I guess you could say that there is a little bit of “Breaking Away” in Casey’s situation, as she believes that her mother needs her, so she is reluctant to leave Columbus.  The audience seemed to like this movie, although it seems that they were more enthusiastic about it than I was.  I went to the record store and bought a CD of Beatles outtakes from 1968, along with a DVD set of Rocky and Bullwinkle.  I watched a Kung Fu episode called “The Tide.”  Caine was shot and nearly killed.  He found love briefly in this episode, even though it couldn’t last.  Caine has to prove how manly he is with the women once in a while, because ABC couldn’t tolerate any hints that he might be a homosexual.  I also watched the second Addams Family episode, which had a psychiatrist asking Pugsley some questions.  Some of the people who died on August 18 include Honoré de Balzac (1850), Anita Loos (1981), John Sturges (1992), Elmer Bernstein (2004), and Scott McKenzie (2012).  Today is a birthday for Denis Leary (60), Robert Redford (81), and Roman Polanski (84).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for August 18, The Police performed their first concert as a trio at Rebecca’s club in Birmingham, England in 1977.  In 1993, “Manhattan Murder Mystery” was released.  In 2004, Elmer Bernstein, composer of scores for movies such as “The Magnificent Seven” and “The Great Escape,” died of cancer at age 82 at his home in Ojai, California.  In 2006, “Snakes on a Plane,” starring Samuel L. Jackson, was released in the United States.

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Brigsby Bear

Returning from the Coliseum and still having some time left on my day off, I strolled over to the theatre and looked over the offerings and decided on “Brigsby Bear,” not knowing what the movie was about.  I was thirsty from the afternoon in the sun, and I craved an Icee, but I was a dollar short, so I just headed for the seats and discovered that I was all alone.  It certainly was an unusual movie, and it had flaws, but overall I liked it.  A 25-year-old named James has been living his entire life with his parents in the desert, and his favorite television show is something called “Brigsby Bear Adventures,” but he comes to live in the outside world with no more episodes, so he has to adjust to new circumstances.  The movie is something of a blend of “Being There,” “10 Cloverfield Lane,” and “Napoleon Dynamite.”  It raises some questions about what is normal behavior and whether creativity is just a way of not growing up.  I was amazed that there was so much Brigsby Bear merchandise throughout the movie.  It was a lot of stuff to produce for a fake television show.  I liked how Mark Hamill was in the cast, bringing with him a trace of Star Wars with him.  Greg Kinnear was a cop who used to perform Shakespeare.  He must be a true actor if he’s willing to appear in a new Brigsby Bear episode.  I kept thinking about how much older Kinnear looked since his days in “Little Miss Sunshine.”  Claire Danes tries to help James adjust to the real world.  James did have some moments in the film that you could compare to “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”  In one scene, his conversation with a girl was reminiscent of “River’s Edge.”  This movie could become a cult favorite in the years to come.  I thought about whether I could make a meaningful movie if I tried my hand.  This movie made me want to see “Frank” again.  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for August 17, FTD made a record number of floral arrangement deliveries with 3,116 after Elvis Presley’s death.  In 1983, Ira Gershwin died at age 86.  In 1984, the Clint Eastwood movie “Tightrope” was released.

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Blake Treinen’s Loss

I took the buses over to Laney College and saw an almost empty campus.  I stuck around for just a few minutes before I got on the 1 bus to take me to the Fruitvale BART station, and I went from there to the Coliseum.  I went over to the food trucks and bought a tri-tip beef sandwich and then a creamsicle shake.  I had forgotten to bring my sunscreen.  Paul Blackburn was the A’s starting pitcher, and he had a tough time getting through four innings against the Royals on this afternoon.  He allowed two walks and two singles in the first inning but escaped giving up only one run.  After a clean second inning, he gave up two singles and a walk in the third run, but a strikeout and a double play got him out of the jam without allowing any runs.  On offense, the A’s had singles from Marcus Semien and Jed Lowrie in the first inning but failed to score.  After a quiet second inning, Dustin Garneau walked to start the third inning, and after Rajai Davis struck out, Semien hit a ball that bounced off the top of the left field scoreboard for a home run and a 2-1 A’s lead.  However, Blackburn couldn’t come up with the shutdown inning in the fourth.  On a single, Matt Chapman made a bad throw, and the runner went all the way to third base.  After a ground out to first, a single tied the score at 2-2, and after a fly ball for an out to right field, Blackburn went to a 3-1 count before giving up a home run, making the score 4-2.  He struck out the following hitter to end his afternoon, having thrown 97 pitches in four innings and seeing his ERA increase from 3.12 to 3.46.  Simon Castro pitched the top of the fifth inning, and he gave up two singles and a walk for one run.  The A’s did answer in the bottom of the inning.  Garneau drew a walk on a 3-2 pitch, and Rajai Davis doubled.  After Semien struck out, Lowrie singled for two runs, making the score 5-4.  Chris Hatcher, who had come over in a trade with the Dodgers, pitched the top of the sixth inning, and he had a clean inning.  The A’s wasted a scoring chance in the bottom of the inning, as Chad Pinder walked and Matt Chapman singled, but Matt Joyce, Matt Olson, and Rajai Davis all made outs.  In the Big Head race, everyone got off to a slow start, and Dennis Eckersley barely finished past Rollie Fingers.  Before the next home game on the 25th, Gate D of the Coliseum will officially be renamed after Eckersley.  Daniel Coulombe pitched the top of the seventh inning and gave up only a two-out hit and a wild pitch.  During the seventh inning stretch, we heard “Stuck in the Middle with You,” bringing back memories of “Reservoir Dogs.”  The A’s did nothing in the bottom of the seventh inning.  Ryan Dull went to the mound for the top of the eighth inning.  He walked the first batter.  After a force play and a stolen base, Dull hit a batter with a pitch.  A single gave the Royals a run.  After a passed ball put the runners at second and third, Dull got a strikeout for the second out.  After going to a 2-0 count, he intentionally walked the batter to load the bases.  He was in danger of giving up at least one more run when he got to another 3-2 count, but then got the strikeout to end the inning.  The question was whether the A’s could duplicate the eighth inning magic they had on Tuesday night.  Healy singled, but Pinder struck out.  Chapman swung at the first pitch for a home run that tied the game at 6-6.  Joyce struck out on three pitches, but Bruce Maxwell singled.  Rajai Davis singled, and Maxwell went to third base on an error.  Rajai stole second base, but Semien grounded out for the third out.  Blake Treinen had thrown a lot of pitches on Tuesday night, but Bob Melvin sent him out for the top of the ninth inning.  He got into trouble almost immediately, as he went 2-0 to the first hitter before giving up a double.  Treinen went to a 3-2 count to the following hitter before giving up a single, which gave the Royals a 7-6.  Maxwell got the first out by throwing out the runner trying to steal second base, and then Treinen got a ground ball to Chapman and a strikeout to end the inning.  We saw the Belushi Animal House video clip, but the team in the dugout was indifferent to it  Lowrie flied out to center on a 3-2 pitch.  Khris Davis had struck out his previous four times at bat, but on a 2-0 pitch, this time he also flied out to center.  Healy hit a ground ball that was a close play at first base.  He was ruled safe, but the play was reviewed.  There was a bit of suspense in the decision, because an overturned call would end the game.  Boog Powell pinch-ran for Healy.  The ruling was safe, bringing Pinder up to bat.  A wild pitch allowed Boog to go to second base, but Pinder struck out to end the game.  The A’s had lost two out of three to the Royals.  The game had started at 12:37 with a game time temperature of 68 degrees, and it ended at 4:14.  The attendance was 15,239.  There are only fifteen games left for the A’s at the Coliseum this season.  The A’s were going on a road trip to Houston and Baltimore, and I was taking the train back home.  Some of the people who died on August 17 include Vivian Vance (1979), Ira Gershwin (1983), and Pearl Bailey (1990).  Today is a birthday for Sean Penn (57), Belinda Carlisle (59), and Robert De Niro (74).

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Matt Joyce’s Two-Out Bases-Loaded Three-Run Double

I wanted to go to a last Tuesday movie before the beginning of the fall semester, so I took the buses out to Jack London Square to see “Atomic Blonde” again.  I felt sad leaving the theatre.  I took the buses out to the Fruitvale BART station.  I arrived at the Coliseum early and browsed through the team store before I rested on a bench.  The gates opened early, and I went to see batting practice for a while until the A’s left the field at about 5:10, and then I went over to the food trucks.  I bought the lamb gyro, and then a root beer float.  We heard songs like “Got to Be Real,” “Pressure Drop,” and “Jukebox Hero” before the game began.  Chris Smith had a rough start in pitching the first inning, as he walked the first batter and hit the second batter with a pitch.  A double gave the Royals two runs, and a single brought in one more run.  Smith then settled down and got six consecutive outs before giving up a single, and then he got nine consecutive outs.  The A’s answered the three runs the Royals scored in the first inning with one of their own, a home run from Matt Joyce that made the score 3-1.  In the second inning, Matt Olson hit a home run to make the score 3-2.  We saw a game in which one A’s player named eight Hall of Fame players in 15 seconds.  He could have named nine if he had mentioned the A’s five players and then Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio, and Mantle.  In the third inning with one out, Jed Lowrie singled and Khris Davis hit a home run to give the A’s a 4-3 lead.  Daniel Coulombe took the mound with one out in the sixth inning and did a good job, getting four consecutive outs.  Ryan Dull got a strikeout for the last out in the seventh inning.  During the seventh inning, we heard “Rock and Roll All Nite.”  On offense, the A’s were quiet after the Davis home run, getting only singles from Healy and Semien, and a double from Chapman through the end of the seventh inning.  From the scoreboard, we learned that it had been six years since Jim Thome hit his 600th home run.  A fan was able to hit only two wiffle home runs in a contest.  The Kiss Cam caught one woman who seemed angry.  The A’s relief pitchers were trying to get Chris Smith his first win, but they still had to get six outs.  Santiago Casilla took the mound for the top of the ninth inning. He seemed upset when he didn’t get a strike call from the umpire.  Casilla then gave up a home run, suddenly giving the Royals a 5-4 lead.  The fans were disgusted.  After getting the first out, Casilla gave up a single, and Bob Melvin brought in Blake Treinen.  The fans booed Casilla as he left the field.  The scoreboard showed that Treinen had an ERA of 1.29.  Five pitches later, it was 1.88, as he gave up a home run, giving the Royals a 7-4 lead.  The game seemed to have slipped away completely.  On Treinen’s next pitch, he got an out, but then he went to a 2-0 count to the following batter before giving up another home run.  Treinen’s ERA jumped up to 2.45.  He got a strikeout to end the inning.  The A’s at least had two innings to make up four runs so their chance to win this game was merely improbable and not nearly impossible.  Jed Lowrie got the bottom of the eighth inning to a good start, hitting a double when the count on him was 3-2.  The A’s then got three consecutive singles, from Khris Davis, Ryon Healy, and Matt Olson.  The Healy single was a long single.  The last two hits brought in one run each, so now the score was 8-6.  Matt Chapman and Chad Pinder both struck out, but a wild pitch moved the runners to second and third.  Rajai Davis went up to pinch-hit for Boog Powell, and after the count got to 2-0, the Royals intentionally walked him.  Matt Joyce then came up with the biggest hit of the game, a hit that bounced off the left field wall for a double and three runs.  The crowd could hardly believe that after the demoralizing five runs in the top of the inning, the A’s could come back with five runs in the bottom of the inning to retake the lead.  Marcus Semien followed with a single to make the score 10-8, and then Lowrie came up to bat for the second time in the inning but struck out to end the inning.  Treinen went back out to the mound for the top of the ninth inning.  Things got slightly uncomfortable when he went to a 3-2 count to the first batter and gave up a single.  He went to a 3-2 to the second batter, also, but this time he got a strikeout, making the crowd feel better.  One pitch later, Joyce caught a ball in right field for the second out.  It didn’t look as though the game would slip away at this point.  Treiner struck out the next batter to end the game.  He got the vulture win, as I would hear on the radio later, as Chris Smith’s chance went up in smoke with Casilla’s mistake.  Ken Korach called this a miraculous win.  The game had started at 7:07 with a game time temperature of 63 degrees, and it ended at 10:23.  The attendance was 13,875.  It was Jewish Heritage Night, so some fans were wearing beanies with Hebrew letters on them.  As I left the stadium, the usher in my section commented on how exciting the game was.  I read on Twitter about the death of Ron Palillo five years ago.  He suffered a heart attack.  Tyne Daly hosted a tribute to him on October 3, 2012.  Marcia Strassman died on October 24, 2014.  I listened to Chris Townsend on the radio after the game, and he again said that the signings of Billy Butler and Santiago Casilla were questionable.  When I got home, I saw the game highlights on the news, and then Stephen Colbert’s monologue.  I caught a glimpse of Lynda Day George on Match Game.  Some of the people who died on August 16 include Robert Johnson (1938), Babe Ruth (1948), Margaret Mitchell (1949), Bela Lugosi (1956), Elvis Presley (1977), Amanda Blake (1989), Stewart Granger (1993), and William Windom (2012).  Today is a birthday for Steve Carell (55), Timothy Hutton (57), Angela Bassett (59), Madonna (59), and James Cameron (63).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for August 16, Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow finalized their divorce in 1968.  In 1969, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young performed for the first time after Neil Young joined the group, with Joni Mitchell the opening act.  In 1986, Madonna celebrated her 28th birthday as she had both the Number One single, “Papa Don’t Preach,” and the Number One album, “True Blue.”

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