The Heiress

After I got home, I watched “The Heiress,” the movie directed by William Wyler starring Olivia de Havilland, Montgomery Clift, and Ralph Richardson.  Olivia is Catherine Sloper, the foolish young woman who falls in love with the poor and probably fortune hunting Clift.  Richardson is her cold father.  This is Olivia de Havilland’s show, as she is quite remarkable in being so plain and so naïve in believing in this relationship.  She and the entire movie reminded me quite a bit of Joan Fontaine and “Suspicion.”  There is a bit of suspense in a few of the scenes.  Is the father really going to crush his daughter’s hopes?  Has Catherine really not learned anything from experience?  I imagine this movie was difficult to film, with the long takes and Wyler’s demanding ways.  It seemed that the song Clift sang was an early version of “Can’t Help Falling in Love,” the Elvis Presley hit.  This is one of those movies in which the main character undergoes a dramatic transformation, although not quite the same as Al Pacino in “The Godfather.”  I agreed with a lot of things Richardson was saying.  The mistake he made was that he was too cruel to Catherine.  I thought he should have left his fortune to charity.  Perhaps the most annoying character was Catherine’s aunt, who apparently never learned anything in life.  I thought Olivia de Havilland fully deserved the Oscar she won for this movie.  The idea of the plain woman wanting to marry the questionable suitor made me think of Elaine May and Walter Matthau in “A New Leaf.”  In a way, Wyler went back to this theme in “Funny Girl.”  I thought this was one of William Wyler’s better films.  However, I’m not sure that the revenger at the end was any kind of an equalizer.  Catherine is still going to be miserable with her embroidery, and the man at the door can find another woman.  I read the news that Erin Moran likely died of cancer.  That was rather disturbing because she wasn’t much older than I am now.  I watched a new Supergirl episode.  I watched some of the eleven o’clock news.  Allison Janney was one of the guests on the Stephen Colbert show.  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 25, Elvis Presley had the Number One single “Stuck on You” in 1960.  In 1987, U2 was Number One on the album chart with “The Joshua Tree,” which had the hit singles “With or Without You” and “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”  In 2009, Bea Arthur of the “Maude” television series died of cancer at age 86.

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Peyton Place

I dealt with some of the problems that came up on a Monday at work and was glad to return home.  I had my late lunch and sat down to watch “Peyton Place.”  I thought it was quite a trashy movie and was amazed that it got nine Oscar nominations and not surprised that it didn’t win any.  Some of the content of the novel had to be toned down for the movies.  Diane Varsi, who played Allison, seemed to me to be a mixture of Lee Remick, Mariel Hemingway, and Kirsten Dunst.  Lana Turner was the mother.  It seems that in these small-town stories there always has to be some hidden secret about an illegitimate child.  I liked Lana Turner in this movie.  Russ Tamblyn was a shy classmate.  It was hard to believe he was the same actor who would dance around in “West Side Story.”  Hope Lange was Selena, the girl from the poor side of town with the alcoholic, abusive stepfather.  She was Allison’s best friend.  Hope Lange looked so young in this picture.  I wondered what she did during the years between this movie and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.  Lorne Greene was the prosecutor.  I kept thinking that this movie could have a cult following like “Valley of the Dolls.”  There were quite a few moments that today’s audiences would laugh at.  Hope had a scene that reminded me of the Ramones song with the lyrics “Beat on the brat, beat on the brat, beat on the brat with a baseball bat, oh yeah.”  Lana Turner was an overbearing mother along the lines of Joan Crawford in “Mommie Dearest.”  Some of the courtroom procedures at the end didn’t seem genuine, and the endless speech that the doctor gave was nauseating.  The story starts off just before the end of the school year in 1941 and goes on for about two years.  Allison did look like a teenager in the beginning and show some change at the end.  She reminded me of the girl in “Little Women” who went to the big city to try to become a writer.  The setting was a New England town that could have been in either New Hampshire or Maine.  Everyone spoke with accents like they were ancestors of the characters in “Manchester by the Sea.”  Two of the characters die, one during the war and the other killed.  Otherwise, other conflicts are resolved, and the ending is supposed to be uplifting.  The picture quality was better than I expected from this DVD.  It was a CinemaScope film, and some of that New England beauty came through, although some of the footage reportedly came from “The Trouble with Harry.”  I can’t say that I was bored with this movie.  It wasn’t one of the masterpieces of cinema, however.  Some of the people who died on April 25 include George Sanders (1972), Carol Reed (1976), Dexter Gordon (1990), Art Fleming (1995), Ginger Rogers (1995), Saul Bass (1996), Boris Pickett (2007), Bea Arthur (2009), and Dorothy Provine (2010).  Today is a birthday for Talia Shire (71) and Al Pacino (77).

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Andrew Triggs’ Terrible Third Inning

I watched CBS Sunday Morning.  Serena Altschul spoke with Rob Lowe about “The Outsiders,” although I had the feeling that she wanted to talk with Tom Cruise.  S.E. Hinton made comments about the popularity of the book.  My parents spoke with me briefly and seemed confused about what time of the year it was.  I went to buy some groceries before heading over to the BART station.  I got to the line outside the gate early, although there was no special rush for the giveaway, which was a pair of striped socks.  I took a look at the food trucks and decided to get a chicken club.  I felt better after eating, and I then bought a chocolate malt and headed for my seat.  The Little Leaguers were taking a walk around the field.  On the pregame radio show, I heard Ray Fosse talking with Catfish Hunter, who said he didn’t like going to 3-2 counts to hitters.  Some of the A’s pitchers could have learned something from what he said.  A’s fans had hopes for a win because starting pitcher Andrew Triggs was bringing an ERA of 0.00 to the game.  Triggs hit the first Seattle batter of the game with a pitch.  After a stolen base and a sacrifice bunt, a single gave the Mariners a 1-0 lead.  Triggs did get the next five batters out, so he did have a clean second inning.  In the third inning, four of the first five Mariners reached base safely, with two singles and two walks and one run scoring.  Triggs got a strikeout, giving the fans hope that he would get out of the inning with the score still at 2-0.  However, with the count at 1-0, Triggs gave up a grand slam.  Suddenly, the score was 6-0, and the game was all but officially over.  Triggs got six out of the next seven Mariners out, getting a clean fourth inning and giving up just a single in the fifth inning.  Bob Melvin called on Daniel Coulombe to take the mound.  He threw a lot of pitches to the first batter he faced but got the out to end the inning.  Coulombe made it through the sixth inning without giving up any runs, although he allowed two walks with one out.  Meanwhile, the A’s had not done much to score any runs of their own.  Only three A’s had reached safely: Stephen Vogt with a single in the first inning, Matt Joyce with a walk in the second inning, and Ryon Healy with a single in the fourth inning.  In the Big Head race, Rollie Fingers won again.  Raul Alcantara went out to the mound to pitch the seventh inning, and he was terrible.  He walked the first batter he faced, and then gave up a single, and then a home run, so quickly the score was 9-0.  He got out of the inning with the help of Matt Olson in right field, who made a good catch and threw to first base for a double play.  A’s fans saw on the scoreboard that the Giants had suffered a 8-0 loss against the Rockies and didn’t want to see their team get shut out, too.  In the bottom of the seventh inning, Ryon Healy doubled, making him the only A’s player to get two hits during the afternoon.  Yonder Alonso flied out to left.  Trevor Plouffe singled, allowing Healy to get to third base and prompting a pitching change.  Matt Joyce hit a sacrifice fly to left field, making the score 9-1.  Some fans cheered sarcastically, although some were happy to finally see the home team score a run.  Adam Rosales struck out to end the inning.  During the break, we heard James Brown’s “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag.”  Alcantara had a clean eighth inning.  The radio announcers talked about the organist who was in the stadium for a Sunday afternoon, and they discussed the differences between a ballpark, a stadium, and a facility.  I didn’t notice any comments about whether the Coliseum was a stadium or a facility.  They also talked about the Kaval sandwich, which had buttermilk waffles, a beef patty, and chicken.  At 2:57, the crowd did The Wave for a few minutes.  At 3:56, the seagulls showed up in the third deck.  They seemed eager for this game to end.  The crowd danced along to “Y.M.C.A.”  Alcantara, though, would not get through the top of the ninth inning cleanly.  He gave up a double to the first batter.  After an out to left field, he got to a 3-2 count before giving up another double for the tenth Mariners run.  A single made the score 11-1.  Bob Melvin sure didn’t want to use another relief pitcher to end this game, which was an obvious lost cause.  Another double put runners and second and third.  Alcantara, though, somehow managed to get the next two batters out on fly balls.  In the bottom of the inning, Stephen Vogt lined out to left.  Healy wasn’t able to get a third hit, as he grounded out to second.  Alonso doubled, but Plouffe struck out to end the game.  This game began at 1:07 with a game time temperature of 64 degrees, and it ended at 4:18.  The attendance was 24,165.  We had not quite seen ten consecutive days of baseball because of the rainout last Sunday.  We will not have another home game until May 5.  I listened to some Chuck Berry music on the way out of the stadium.  I stopped at the record store and bought vinyl copies of a Beatles album and an Allman Brothers album.  I listened to Robert Hilburn’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Times radio program on KCSN.  He played tracks from a Joni Mitchell tribute album, and also a Leonard Cohen tribute album.  I thought two of the best songs were “Ladies of the Canyon” and “Suzanne.”  The first Columbo episode was “Last Salute to the Commodore” with Robert Vaughn.  The late episode was “A Bird in the Hand.”  I wanted to watch “Kochak: The Night Stalker” before I went to sleep.  Some of the people who died on April 24 include Daniel Defoe (1731), Bud Abbott (1974), Pat Paulsen (1997), and Billy Paul (2016).  Today is a birthday for Barbra Streisand (75) and Shirley MacLaine (83).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 24, Pink Floyd released their first single, “Arnold Layne,” in 1967.  In 1976, Saturday Night Live producer offered The Beatles a certified check for $3000 to appear on the show.

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Born in China

I arrived at the theatre about ten minutes before “Born in China” was to start.  The photography was remarkable, although they gave us too many clouds.  This documentary shows us the stories of panda bears, monkeys, and snow leopards.  We see humorous moments, like the pandas trying to scratch an itch, and the panda cub stumbling down the hill.  The monkey feels sibling jealousy and hangs out with a group of lost boys, bringing to mind the movie from the 1980s with Kiefer Sutherland.  Are the filmmakers trying to teach us some sort of lesson about growing up?  If they are, they are being rather annoying.  The snow leopard segment is rather disturbing, as it is a story of survival that brings to mind Jack London.  The mother of the cubs has to go out and kill in order for them to continue living, and it certainly isn’t easy.  I was a bit irritated with the filmmakers giving names to the animals and showing them as nearly human.  I don’t know why the filmmakers had to give us this philosophy of the circle of life.  They must not be scientists if they are making such statements.  The ending credits showed a glimpse of the making of the movie.  It seemed that at times the monkey were too familiar with the filmmakers.  They also seemed to sit around waiting for a long time for the weather to change.  This documentary wasn’t as meaningful to me as “The Living Desert” and “The Vanishing Prairie” were to me when I was a child.  The world of animals is so exciting when you’re young.  I wished for a different approach for this movie.  I wondered if they used drones for some shots.  If you find pandas adorable and monkey interesting for their intelligence, you might want to have a look at this movie.  I imagine it’s better on a big screen than on television.  I went over to the record store on Record Store Day.  The only good item that had left was the box set of Randy Newman, which I didn’t want to buy for $100.  I heard the news that Erin Moran had died.  It was quite disturbing to hear, because she was not much older than I am now.  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 23, the Ash Grove at 8162 Melrose Avenue in West Los Angeles was destroyed by a fire in 1969.  In 1987, Carole King sue Lou Adler for breach of contract, asking for $400,000 and rights to her recordings.  In 1995, Howard Cosell died in Manhattan at age 77 of a cardiac embolism.  In 2002, Jerry Lee Lewis announced that he and his sixth wife Kerrie were divorcing after 17 years of marriage.

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Jed Lowrie’s Three Hits and Two Runs

After I awoke, I watched the Partridge Family episode “The Diplomat.”  I thought I saw Laurie eating something in one scene, but I couldn’t tell what it was.  I watched CBS This Morning and their chef segment.  Some of Mike Randolph’s signature recipes include Chili-roasted pork coppa with apple glaze, Roasted mushrooms with taleggio cheese and baby arugula, Roasted brussels sprouts with honey and pecorino, and Roasted Romaine Salad.  I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on April 22, 1972 were “Doctor My Eyes,” “A Cowboy’s Work is Never Done,” “Heart of Gold,” “Day Dreaming,” “Betcha By Golly, Wow,” “In the Rain,” “A Horse with No Name,” “I Gotcha,” “Rockin’ Robin,” and “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.”  I took the bus out to the MacArthur BART station, and I headed over to the Coliseum.  After the gates opened, I got the T-shirt that was the giveaway, and went to one of the food trucks to have some chicken.  That was a good meal, and I bought a sundae and headed for my seat.  I must have fallen asleep for a while.  I saw Kara Tsuboi and Ruby Lopez sitting near me talking about a special A’s shirt in Warriors colors.  It looked like both of them were going to have their babies pretty soon.  Jharel Cotton was the A’s starting pitcher, and he gave up a home run to the third Seattle Mariner to come up to bat in the game.  However, the home team responded in the bottom of the first inning.  Adam Rosales hit a home run to tie the score at 1-1.  Jed Lowrie singled, and then Ryon Healy followed with a home run to give the A’s a 3-1 lead.  Cotton allowed the first three batters in the third inning to reach base, although one runner was caught stealing.  A sacrifice fly, though, allowed the Mariners to get the score to 3-2.  However, in the bottom of the inning, Lowrie singled and Healy doubled.  Khris Davis grounded out but brought in the run for a 4-2 score.  Cotton had a clean fourth inning.  He allowed a double and a single in the fifth, but kept the Mariners from scoring.  He pitched another clean inning in the sixth, which would be his last of the afternoon.  In the Big Head race, Rollie Fingers pulled away from Rickey Henderson down the stretch to win for the 46th time.  Rickey Henderson and Dennis Eckersley have both won only 28 times.  Frankie Montas had a quick and clean seventh inning.  Daniel Coulombe was brought in to face Robinson Cano in the top of the eighth inning, but Coulombe gave up a single, so Bob Melvin made the change to Liam Hendriks.  Hendriks annoyingly walked the first batter he saw, but then got a ground ball for a double play.  He faced a pinch hitter and allowed a triple that Jaff Decker could not catch against the outfield wall, and so the Mariners had the score at 4-3.  Ryan Madson was summoned to attempt a four-out save.  Lowrie made a good play on a ground ball that prevented the run from scoring and went for the third out.  In the ninth inning, Madson struck out the first two batters, but then gave up a single.  A stolen base made the crowd feel highly uncomfortable, but then Madson struck out the next batter to end the game.  Suddenly, it was a five-game winning streak and a 10-8 record for the A’s.  The game had started at 7:07 with a game time temperature of 66 degrees and ended at 4:14. The attendance was 20,722.  Ken Korach on the radio praised Jed Lowrie’s defensive play.  Lowrie also had three hits in the game, and he scored two runs.  I rushed out of the stadium because I wanted to catch the 5:20 showing of “Born in China.”  Some of the people who died on April 23 include William Shakespeare (1616), Buster Crabbe (1983), Harold Arlen (1986), Otto Preminger (1986), Paulette Goddard (1990), Johnny Thunders (1991), Satyajit Ray (1992), Cesar Chavez (1993), Howard Cosell (1995), and David Halberstam (2007).  Today is a birthday for George Lopez (56), Valerie Bertinelli (57), Michael Moore (63), Joyce DeWitt (68), and Lee Majors (78).

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Sean Manaea’s First Win

I didn’t feel too good as I left work.  I looked through the record store and bought two Herb Alpert albums and DVDs of “The Four Musketeers” and “That Thing You Do!”  I took the bus to the BART station and took the train to the Coliseum.  I was annoyed that I had to ride a five-car train that was packed full of people.  When I got to the stadium, the gates were opened.  The giveaway was a calendar.  I walked to the food trucks.  I bought a lobster roll, which was pretty good if expensive.  I bought a mango flavored Italian ice and headed for my seat.  I saw Ryon Healy signing autographs.  Sean Manaea was the A’s starting pitcher facing the Mariners.  He gave up a single in the first inning, and a walk and a single in the second inning, but the score was still 0-0 going into the third inning.  With two outs in the third, Manaea gave up a single and then a triple, putting the Mariners ahead, 1-0.  He had a clean fourth inning.  The A’s tied the score in the fifth inning when Trevor Plouffe hit a home run.  Manaea allowed a single and a walk in the sixth inning, but he got the last out on a strikeout.  Yonder Alonso swung at the first pitch in the bottom of the sixth inning and hit an impressive home run, putting the A’s ahead, 2-1.  Jed Lowrie doubled and went to third base when Khris Davis hit a ground ball for an out.  Stephen Vogt hit a fly ball to right field that scored Lowrie for a 3-1 lead.  We saw a Big Head race, which Dennis Eckersley managed to win, closely followed by Rollie Fingers.  Ryan Dull came in to pitch the top of the seventh inning, and he made things slightly uncomfortable by allowing a walk and a single, but he did get the outs without giving up any runs.  The A’s loaded the bases in the bottom of the inning but didn’t score.  We wondered if the team would regret letting this chance to score slip away.  Sean Doolittle pitched the top of the eighth inning, and he did pitch a clean inning.  Santiago Casilla pitched the top of the ninth inning, and after a strikeout, he got some help from a good catch of a ball by Khris Davis.  The last out of the game was a fly ball.  The A’s record was 9-8, and so the crowd was happy.  The game had started at 7:07 with a game time temperature of 68 degrees, and it ended at 9:58.  The attendance was 15,255.  I wasn’t too interested in basketball scores.  I heard that Madison Bumgarner had suffered an injury from a dirt bike accident.  Some of the people who died on April 22 include Miguel de Cervantes (1616), Will Geer (1978), Ansel Adams (1984), Richard Nixon (1994), Erma Bombeck (1996), Linda Lovelace (2002), Felice Bryant (2003), and Richie Havens (2013).  Today is a birthday for Peter Frampton (67), Jack Nicholson (80), and Glen Campbell (81).

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Trevor Plouffe’s Big Home Run

I finished up my lecture and too BART over to the Coliseum.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time to swing by the food trucks.  I got to my seat before the first pitch.  The A’s starting pitcher against the Seattle Mariners on this night was Cesar Valdez.  He got into trouble in the first two innings.  In the first, he gavup two singles that resulted in the Mariners taking a 1-0 lead.  In the second inning, Valdez allowed two doubles, a single, and a walk, giving the Mariners a 3-0 lead.  It looked as though the Mariners would continue to score with a runner at first base and still only one out, but Jed Lowrie made a good play on a 4-3 double play to end the inning.  Valdez would go on to pitch a clean third inning, and the A’s would come back in the bottom of the inning.  Jaff Decker, Rajai Davis, and Adam Rosales each hit singles, and an error on the Rosales hit allowed the second run to score.  After Lowrie and Khris Davis both struck out, Ryon Healy doubled to tie the score at 3-3.  Valdez managed to keep the Mariners from scoring in the fourth inning, as he allowed only a two-out walk, although a wild pitch put the runner at second base.  Frankie Montas pitched a clean fifth inning.  In the bottom of the fifth inning, Rajai Davis singled, but the centerfielder made an error, and so Davis ended up at third base.  Rosales followed with a sacrifice fly, and the A’s took the lead at 4-3.  Lowrie doubled and went to third base on a wild pitch.  Khris Davis walked.  Healy singled to make the score 5-3.  Davis stole third base, but Trevor Plouffe struck out for the third time in the game, and Matt Joyce came in to pinch hit for Chad Pinder but also struck out.  Unfortunately, Montas gave up a double and a home run in the top of the sixth inning, and so the score was 5-5 when Ryan Dull was brought in to pitch.  He got the next two batters out.  In the bottom of the inning, Josh Phegley doubled and went to second base on Decker’s sacrifice bunt. Rajai Davis’ ground out gave the A’s the lead again at 6-5.  Dull got two outs in the top of the seventh inning before giving up a walk.  Sean Doolittle came in and got the third out.  Kara Tsuboi and her crew came by near my seat to sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” during the seventh inning stretch.  With one out in the bottom of the inning, Khris Davis and Healy both walked on 3-2 pitches, and then Trevor Plouffe swung at the first pitch and hit a three-run home run that seemed to clinch the game.  Ryan Madson pitched a clean eighth inning.  Santiago Casilla came in to pitch the top of the ninth inning, and he gave up a double to the first hitter.  The runner went to third base on a ground out to first.  The next batter walked, and then a sacrifice fly gave the Mariners another run.  A ground ball to Lowrie ended the game.  The fans were pretty happy with three consecutive wins.  My section received Round Table Pizza coupons after the Plouffe home run.  The game had begun at 7:08 with a game time temperature of 64 degrees, and it ended at 10:17.  The attendance was 10,707.  I felt rather happy as I headed home.  I watched Stephen Colbert and ate a couple of oranges before I went to bed.  Some of the people who died on April 21 include Mark Twain (1910), Gummo Marx (1977), Erté (1990), Jimmy the Greek (1996), Nina Simone (2003), and Prince (2016).  Today is a birthday for Andie MacDowell (59), Tony Danza (66), Iggy Pop (70), and Queen Elizabeth II (91).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 21, Elvis Presley had the Number One single “Good Luck Charm” in 1962.  In 1973, the Number One single was Tony Orlando and Dawn’s “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree.”  In 1989, “Pet Sematary” was released.  In 1993, “Walker, Texas Ranger” made its debut on CBS.

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