The Country Girl

I did some preparation for my final exams and worked my shift.  I set up my speaker system and listened to the Beatles’ “Revolver” album through it.  I found in my mail the DVD copy of “The Country Girl” that I had ordered.  It was a movie from 1954 that was nominated for a Best Picture Oscar.  Grace Kelly won a Best Actress Oscar for her role, narrowly winning over Judy Garland in “A Star is Born.”  Bing Crosby did do some singing, but it was mostly a dramatic role.  He plays the alcoholic Frank Elgin, way on the downside of his career, weak and dependent on his wife Georgie.  I thought that Crosby was quite good with his performance, although I didn’t entirely believe that he could be so weak.  William Holden is the director Bernie Dodd.  I didn’t think Holden was quite right as a screenwriter in “Sunset Blvd,” and I couldn’t see him as a director, either.  He was fifteen years younger than Crosby.  I suppose that is part of the uncomfortable situation, having to take direction from someone substantially younger than you are.  The turning point in Frank’s life is told in flashback, not the greatest device in movies, showing a fatal accident that happened in front of him as he was posing for a photo.  That kid was awfully stupid if he couldn’t avoid traffic when he’s lived in the city.  Grace Kelly was made up to look dowdy and worn down.  She has quite a few excellent lines of dialogue to say, although I wouldn’t say that she fit the role all that well.  The Academy seems to reward these women who go through these transformations for their roles, thinking back to more recent films like “Monster” with Charlize Theron.  The story does contain quite a bit of tension, as Frank seems so hopeless and insecure that it seems this whole production is going to end in disaster.  It felt like this picture had elements of “Birdman” and “My Favorite Year,” although without the humor.  The ending was dictated by the motion picture code, but studio executives wouldn’t have wanted her to ruin her image, which actually contrasted quite a bit from her real-life behavior.  This movie must have seemed very brave and bold back in 1954, especially in the way it showed the behavior of alcoholics.  It was very much a departure from the drunken humor people saw in pictures from John Ford, Frank Capra, and William Wyler.  The other Best Picture nominees that year were “The Caine Mutiny,” “On the Waterfront,” “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” and “Three Coins in the Fountain.”  I think I would rate “The Country Girl” right in the middle of that group, behind “On the Waterfront” and “The Caine Mutiny.”  “The Country Girl” is mostly three stars and a script.  It did feel too close to being a play at moments.  Edith Head did the costume design, and Ira Gershwin and Harold Arlen contributed to the music.  George Seaton won an Oscar for the screenplay.  We would remember Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and William Holden more for other pictures, but this one does have strong moments.  Some of the people who died on December 12 include Douglas Fairbanks (1939), Tallulah Bankhead (1968), Jack Cassidy (1976), Anne Baxter (1985), Joseph Heller (1999), George Montgomery (2000), Peter Boyle (2006), Ike Turner (2007), Van Johnson (2008), and Audrey Totter (2013).  Today is a birthday for Jennifer Connelly (47), Sheila E. (60), Cathy Rigby (65), Tom Wilkinson (69), Dionne Warwick (77), Connie Francis (79), and Bob Barker (93).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 12, Frank Sinatra was born 102 years ago today in Hoboken, New Jersey.

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The Disaster Artist

It was a pretty cold morning, and my parents told me my phone was unplugged the first time they tried to phone me.  I went out to the plaza to sit around and look at my computer for a while, and then I walked to Trader Joe’s to buy some chicken soup.  I listened to Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me as I took the buses out to Jack London Square.  I walked through the farmers’ market and got into line to buy my movie ticket for “The Disaster Artist.”  It brought to mind several other movies, like “Ed Wood” and “Boogie Nights.”  It was about the making of a bad movie called “The Room.”  It featured appearances by Melanie Griffith, Judd Apatow, Sharon Stone, and Bryan Cranston.  The stars were James Franco and Dave Franco as Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero, respectively.  Tommy is a colorful character and very mysterious, as no one knows where he is from, how old he is, or how he possesses a great deal of money.  These two guys have a great enthusiasm for James Dean, which made me think back to references to “Rebel Without a Cause” in “La La Land.”  “The Disaster Artist” is not like “La La Land.”  These two people were something like Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman in “Ishtar,” but without the spy plot.  What is a James Franco film without Seth Rogen?  It is amazing that “The Room” was completed and was shown anywhere.  This movie reminded me of those short features I used to see about the making of various films during the 1970s.  I could hardly believe that the character of Tommy Wiseau wasn’t a wild exaggeration.  I guess some people really are living cariacatures.  What was funny was what people would do to be in a movie.  I thought about the time I was with my friends in the dollar movie theatre to see the cheap horror movie “Humongous.”  It was so weak and so bad that I was laughing, and I was embarrassing my friends by laughing so loudly.  That was until the other people in the theatre caught on to the ridiculousness of the movie and laughed along with me.  Well, I guess “The Room” was like “Humongous,” which I don’t know for sure because I’ve never seen “The Room.”  However, I have seen “Mommie Dearest” and “Showgirls.”  Tommy thought that Johnny Depp could play him in a movie, and that is true, but the reason it was never going to happen is that Johnny Depp was already in “Ed Wood.”  The movie takes place in the years from 1998 to 2003.  I thought that this movie was pretty enjoyable, though not brilliant.  I’d already seen it before in films like “Day for Night” and “Ed Wood,” so I didn’t find it hilarious, like the two women who sat behind me.  The one moment that made me laugh out loud was the quote from James Dean, which contributed greatly towards making “The Room” the cult film that it now is.  After the end of the film, we see footage of “The Room” compared to the recreated footage.  The two were highly similar.  One notable thing to say is that there is a brief scene at the very end of the ending credits that features the real Tommy Wiseau.  I wouldn’t call “The Disaster Artist” a satisfying movie, not completely, but it is a film that is going to hang around for a while and win some fans.  From Tommy’s apartment you could see the Capitol Records building.  I thought about Los Angeles and whether I could ever live there again.  They have two NFL teams, at least for now.  I walked over to Walgreens and bought a Hershey’s Christmas mug and then waited for the bus home.  I listened to the radio, with fans reacting angrily to the Raiders’ loss to the Chiefs.  Everyone is critical of Jack Del Rio.  Chris Townsend that he thought more information about the extent of Derek Carr’s back injury would be coming out in the weeks to come.  I went to one of the record stores to buy a CD set of the Beatles’ Hollywood Bowl concerts, and then I went to another record store and bought a vinyl copy of the George Harrison album that had “Blow Away” on it.  The Rams were unable to win at the Coliseum against the Eagles.  A penalty for unsportmanlike conduct and a fumble by Jared Goff were damaging.  I watched the first half of the Steelers and the Ravens.  I tried to listen to Rock ‘n’ Roll Times with Robert Hilburn on KCSN, but could see only a few titles on the playlist, which included The Blasters, Dave Alvin, The Plimsouls, and Peter Case.  I watched a video collection of Partridge Family bloopers, and there was a bit of footage of the TV crew surprising Susan Dey with a birthday cake.  It had trick candles on it.  It could have been any of her birthdays from 18 to 21.  Yesterday she turned 65.  I watched part of a Bob Hope American Masters television program.  I recall watching his television specials years ago and thinking that he was the funniest person who ever lived.  He lived until 2003, and he did reach his 100th birthday.  He lived at 10342 Moorpark Street in Toluca Lake from 1937 until his death.  Dolores Hope also lived to be 100, and she died in 2011.  Some of the people who died on December 11 include Sam Cooke (1964), Percy Kilbride (1964), Bettie Page (2008), and Ravi Shankar (2012).  Today is a birthday for Jermaine Jackson (64), Teri Garr (73), Brenda Lee (73), Donna Mills (77), and Rita Moreno (86).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 11, “Movin’ with Nancy,” a television special starring Nancy Sinatra, was broadcast on NBC in 1967.  In 1982, Toni Basil was Number One on the singles chart with “Mickey.”  In 1978, the first part of a television miniseries about Harriet Tubman, “A Woman Called Moses” starring Cicely Tyson, aired on NBC.  In 1985, the Mary Tyler Moore television series “Mary” premiered on CBS.  In 1992, “The Muppet Christmas Carol” was released.  In 1998, the Michael Keaton movie “Jack Frost” was released.  Today, Rita Moreno from “West Side Story” celebrates her 86th birthday.

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Toivon tuolla puolen

I watched the chef segment of CBS This Morning.  Some of Jeremiah Langhorne’s signature recipes include Sorghum and hot sauce glazed bone-in short ribs with wild horseradish, Roasted squash with kale, smoked feta and pecans, Charred brassicas, nduja hollandaise, mint chimchurri and fried shallots, Radishes with buttermilk dressing, Grilled oysters with country ham vinaigrette, and Butterscotch pie.  I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on December 9, 1972 were “I’m Stone in Love with You,” “Clair,” “Ventura Highway,” “It Never Rains in Southern California,” “Me and Mrs. Jones,” “You Ought to Be with Me,” “I Can See Clearly Now,” “If You Don’t Know Me By Now,” “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” and “I Am Woman.”  I went out to put in my five-hour shift, and then I went over to the theatre to see “The Other Side of Hope.”  Going in, I had no idea what this movie was about.  It showed two men crossing paths.  One is a stowaway named Khaled who arrives in Helsinki from Aleppo.  He reminded me for a while of Robert Downey, Jr. with a bit of Charlie Chaplin around the time of “The Gold Rush.”  The other is Wikström, who leaves his wife and buys a seafood restaurant.  Khaled is in the country illegally and needs an ID and a place to stay.  The comedy is unusual because the characters acted more foolishly than we could believe.  Why didn’t sometime immediately unplug the vacuum cleaner when the inspectors came?  When they tried making sushi, didn’t anyone have even a clue of how to make it?  You’d like they would have had a better idea after reading through the books they bought.  They could have at least watched someone making it, along the lines of “East Side Sushi.”  There was a dog who probably was a good companion but also broke some health codes.  They all seemed to belong together.  Khaled discovers other dangers of being in a foreign country, like facing racists.  He discovers that whereabouts of his sister and attempts to help him.  This is setting up an ending that felt a bit like “El Norte.”  The movie does make you think about what would happen to people like this in the United States.  You can’t expect too much help, especially in this era of Donald Trump.  This movie is worth a look.  I didn’t think it was brilliant, but it’s better than the garbage that is out there on the screens right now.  There were some free posters in the lobby of the theatre, so I looked through some of them and took the one for “The Square.”  I shopped at Trader Joe’s and went over to see the symphony orchestra.  They played Stravinsky and Rachmaninoff.  They had a reception with wine and cheese afterwards, but I felt too sleepy to hang around.  Some of the people who died on December 10 include Damon Runyon (1946), Otis Redding (1967), Ed Wood (1978), Jascha Heifetz (1987), Rick Danko (1999), Marie Windsor (2000), and Richard Pryor (2005).  Today is a birthday for Kenneth Branagh (57) and Susan Dey (65).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 10, Otis Redding died at age 26 in a plane crash in Wisconsin in 1967.  In 1975, 60 million viewers watched John Denver’s “Rocky Mountain Christmas” television special on ABC.  In 2005, Richard Pryor died of a heart attack at age 65.

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Inception

I tried to get some work done at the office.  I was supposed to take part in a webinar, but it was postponed.  I went home to drop off some things, and then I took the bus out to JJ Burger.  I was glad to have a burger before I went to see “Coco” again.  I posed for a photo with the Justice League cutout figures in the lobby before taking my seat.  I enjoyed seeing the movie again, although I didn’t like the coincidence of the film clip of moving Heaven and Earth at the critical moment.  One thing I thought was odd was that they said they didn’t have restrooms in the Land of the Dead, and yet people eat and drink there.  I don’t know how they do it in their skeletal forms, however.  The theatre didn’t show the Frozen short film.  I hurried back to the office because I had left my Amazon Fire tablet charging on the table.  I certainly didn’t want to leave it there overnight.  I watched the Partridge Family episode “My Son, the Feminist.”  I thought that Laurie was about to drink a soda but I don’t think she did.  I watched “Inception” again.  I still find it a difficult film to watch.  I didn’t see what the great love for Marion Cotillard was.  Ellen Page was in some good movies like “Juno,” and she paid a visit to one of our local theatres here when she was promoting “The East.”  She was a small, young woman.  I couldn’t see someone like Taylor Swift in this role.  I could see how Christopher Nolan could take ten year writing this script.  There was a hell of a lot in it.  I didn’t think much of Tom Hardy the first time I saw this movie, but since then I saw him as Mad Max.  I liked the concept of this movie, even though I didn’t like everything about it.  It took me back to “Altered States.”  I would like to go back to see that one again.  I enjoyed seeing Leonardo DiCaprio in this film more than in “Titanic” or “The Revenant.”  If I had my own television show about movies, I’d like to interview Christopher Nolan about “Inception” and “Interstellar.”  Part of this movie had the atmosphere of “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.”  The team that was put together seemed like it was partly a Mission: Impossible squad and also a bit like a film crew.  This task that they have was totally impossible to plan and execute.  I don’t know how anyone could do any improvising to get through any of it.  There was quite a bit of tension in seeing how it was all going to work or not.  It was like aligning the planets.  It might be kind of interesting to compare “Inception” with “Being John Malkovich” or “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.”  “Inception” is a science fiction classic of a sort.  I’ll give Christopher Nolan credit for covering some of this territory in a fascinating and original way.  He can be excessive, but he is not dull.  I watched the Kung Fu episode “The Praying Mantis Kills.”  It had William Schallert in it.  In how many episodes does someone call Caine a coward?  I wondered if David Carradine got hurt when he had to deal with a horse or when his jacket caught fire.  Caine never lost his temper or cursed.  This was one of my favorite television series of years ago.  If I were to become a film director, I would like to direct a movie version of “Kung Fu.”  It would have a story that would be like “The Fugitive,” with a Western setting, and some martial arts thrown in.  This episode had a flashback within a flashback, which is a bit like “Inception.”  Although the day was the anniversary of John Lennon’s shocking death, I didn’t listen to any John Lennon albums.  I thought about going out to see the symphony orchestra perform Stravinsky and Rachmaninoff, but decided to put it off and maybe go on the second night.  I watched some Match Game 75.  Gary Burghoff, Elaine May, and Fannie Flagg are still alive, but John Forsythe, Brett Somers, and Richard Dawson are not.  Some of the people who died on December 9 include Branch Rickey (1965), William A. Wellman (1975), Vincent Gardenia (1992), Gene Barry (2009), Eleanor Parker (2013), and Mary Ann Mobley (2014).  Today is a birthday for Felicity Huffman (55), Donny Osmond (60), John Malkovich (64), Judi Dench (83), and Kirk Douglas (101).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 8, a police officer in New Haven, Connecticut maced Jim Morrison backstage before a concert, leading to his arrest and a crowd riot in 1967.  In 1977, the children’s album “Scouse the Mouse,” featuring Ringo Starr, was released.  In 1988, “Twins,” starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito, was released.

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Elf

I spent the day preparing for my last day of classes before final exam week.  I went to Trader Joe’s to buy a burrito, and I heated it in the microwave oven before I got to work again.  I got texts and photos from a friend living near a wildfire that hit Ventura County.  The fire in this region was still far away from my apartment, even though the smoke could be smelled.  I was tired of answering questions from the few students who showed up.  I bought something to eat on my way home, and I sat down in front of the television to watch “Elf” again.  This was Will Ferrell when he still had a lot of appeal.  I couldn’t stand it when Buddy found the gum on the rail and put it in his mouth.  This movie had some other good cast members.  Mary Steenburgen won an Oscar a while back.  Bob Newhart was still funny, and this was a better place for him than The Big Bang Theory.  I liked Zooey Deschanel’s singing, if not her hair color.  I had forgotten that Ed Asner was Santa Claus.  He has appeared in two good movies since the turn of the millennium, “Elf” and “Up.”  Peter Linkage, who was in “The Station Agent,” has a big, funny scene.  I don’t know why Buddy bothered to out spaghetti sauce on his spaghetti if he liked syrup so much.  The two parts of the movie I liked the most had to do with Buddy’s abilities.  I liked seeing him decorate the North Pole display at Gimbel’s, and naturally I liked seeing him throwing those snowballs.  Farrell reportedly had headaches during filming because he really ate a lot of the sugar that was in front of him.  Couldn’t he have spit it out?  I wonder if Mary Steenburgen really ate that spaghetti with maple syrup.  It was a good bit of casting, getting James Caan to be the father.  Even years after “The Godfather,” he had an intimidating persona, so it was good to see him show some heart.  Since almost all of this takes place in New York City, it made me think that you can’t think that anything is real unless New Yorkers have seen it.  I really liked some of the songs on the soundtrack, which had Stevie Wonder and Frank Sinatra on it.  It’s already been fourteen years since this movie was released.  The Christmas season had gone downhill for me during this time, so it takes a lot more than seeing a crowd of New Yorkers discovering that Santa Claus is real for me to get happy.  I don’t know why Santa had that big book with him in the sleigh.  It’s dangerous to drive the sleigh and try to read at the same time.  I like watching this movie, although I have stronger feelings towards “Bad Santa” and even “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.”  People like Amy Sedaris, Artie Lange, and Peter Billingsley were in the cast, and Leon Redbone’s voice was used, and his singing is on the soundtrack, too.  The movie was a long time coming to the screen, with Jim Carrey originally envisioned as Buddy.  One good thing that Will Farrell did was to turn down the money for an Elf sequel.  It is hard to imagine going any further with this concept.  We didn’t want to see a Bad Santa sequel, either, but it happened, and it got horrible reviews.  I still haven’t seen it.  I thought it was kind of interesting that James Caan and Ed Asner were both in the same movie way before “Elf,” and it was “El Dorado,” with John Wayne and Robert Mitchum back in 1966.  This was a movie that brought back memories of better times, when my family was still intact and I didn’t have to deal with so many problems.  I escaped to a warmer place for an hour and a half before I went back to the television news, with stories about Al Franken, wildfires in southern California, and a city strike.  I saw Melissa McCarthy dressed up as a candy cane on the Jimmy Kimmel show.  Some of the people who died on December 8 include Golda Meir (1978), John Lennon (1980), Marty Robbins (1982), Slim Pickens (1983), Martin Ritt (1990), Howard E. Rollins, Jr. (1996), and John Glenn (2016).  Today is a birthday for Sinéad O’Connor (50), Teri Hatcher (53), and Kim Basinger (64).  The Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 8 reminded us that in 1980, Mark David Chapman shot and killed John Lennon.

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The Matrix

From my office computer, I ordered a copy of “The Country Girl,” since I haven’t seen it in any local store in the months I’ve been searching for it.  I had to go to a cash handling training session although I rarely handle cash in my job.  I had a burger before going home to watch “The Matrix” on Blu-ray.  I have seen it many times, and I thought the cast was very strong, although I thought they could have cast someone besides Carrie-Anne Moss as Trinity.  What would this film have been like with Will Smith, Sandra Bullock, and Russell Crowe?  If Crowe didn’t get the script and couldn’t get past page 42, then he obviously couldn’t have worked out in it.  The actors had to do an outrageous amount of physical training for the fight scenes.  I couldn’t imagine Johnny Depp doing as well as Keanu Reeves with the martial arts.  One reason the sequels didn’t really work was that the interesting and fun things happen quickly.  I mean Neo’s discovery of the real world, and his gaining all of those abilities.  He suddenly says, “I know kung fu,” and it is funny, but also completely unlike Quentin Tarantino’s “Kill Bill, Vol. 2.”  It feels like it’s a bit too much to see this green tint throughout this movie.  Sometimes this commitment to the concept is rather tiring.  Hugo Weaving was so memorable in this movie that I couldn’t accept him in those Lord of the Rings and Hobbit movies, although I did like him in “V for Vendetta.”  Joe Pantoliano was another good actor.  He seemed like a less noticeable version of Joe Pesci, but I liked the scene with him talking about how good food tastes, and how he doesn’t want to know nothin’.  Laurence Fishburne was really outstanding.  I always liked the scene where he fights Neo and asks him why he was able to beat him.  He’s been in some great movies, but I will remember him for “Apocalypse Now,” Cowboy Curtis on Pee-Wee Herman’s show, and “The Matrix.”  I remember him in the news for reacting to a ringing cell phone during a performance of “The Lion in Winter,” as he broke character and yelled at the offender to answer the phone.  I can still sympathize with his outrage, and I’ve always wondered who the idiot was.  Well, some of the thrill of the special effects and images and ideas of “The Matrix” has faded over time because of the numerous imitations and parodies we’ve seen, but it’s still one of the 1001 movies that you have to see before you die.  Some of those ugly machines are things that I didn’t want to look at for more than two hours.  There is a difference between this film and Transformers and Pacific Rim, and much of that difference is Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne.  The first Matrix movie left nothing for the sequels.  How much deeper can you go with these concepts?  It was exhausting to sit through this movie again.  Since 1999, Larry Wachowski has become Lana, and Andy has become Lilly.  They made “V for Vendetta,” “Speed Racer,” “Cloud Atlas,” and “Jupiter Ascending.”  I thought that “V for Vendetta” was a successful movie, and a good one, and “Speed Racer” had some good qualities, but overall I didn’t see the powerful movies that I expected after “The Matrix.”  They did leave their mark on the film world, though.  Some of the people who died on December 7 include Rube Goldberg (1970), Thornton Wilder (1975), Robert Graves (1985), Christopher Connelly (1988), and Harry Morgan (2011).  Today is a birthday for Tom Waits (68), Johnny Bench (70), Ellen Burstyn (85), and Noam Chomsky (89).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for December 7, the Creedence Clearwater Revival album “Pendulum,” featuring the song “Have You Ever Seen the Rain,” was released in 1970.  In 1984, “City Heat,” starring Clint Eastwood and Burt Reynolds, was released.  Today would have been Harry Chapin’s 75th birthday.

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Pulp Fiction

I had a long day of grading papers and dealing with students and giving lectures.  I went for a slice of pizza and returned home and watched the Blu-ray disc of “Pulp Fiction.”  I can hardly believe that soon this movie will be twenty-five years old.  I thought that Brad would have at least a little bit of self-control to not stay “What” with a gun pointed at his head.  Mia didn’t know the difference between Marilyn Monroe and Mamie Van Doren, and she made a gesture of making a figure of a rectangle when she meant square.  I could never understand why Butch left it up to that woman to be responsible for his watch.  I would say that my favorite scene in the picture is Jack Rabbit Slim’s.  It’s funny how Vincent makes a big deal about a five-dollar milkshake when all these years later, five dollars doesn’t seem like much to pay.  Pumpkin says “What” at the end of the movie, but he’s fortunate enough not to get shot.  Quentin Tarantino’s performance wasn’t great, and I kept wondering why he was so worried about getting a divorce.  I didn’t much like how the Neil Diamond song was not sung by Neil Diamond.  Mia makes a mysterious comment about Vincent being an Elvis man that could be explained by one of the deleted scenes.  It was also funny when Lance made a reference to a cellular telephone.  I thought that Butch was headed for a disaster because that woman was just going to drive him crazy.  Christopher Walken gave one of the best performances in the movie, making me wonder what kind of person he really is.  He was really funny, and I couldn’t imagine him keeping a straight face through that dialogue unless he is the greatest actor of all time.  Looking at the credits, I found it uncomfortable to see Harvey Weinstein’s name in there, and one of the special features of the disc was a Charlie Rose interview with Tarantino.  There was another reference to Madonna, which made me think of Madonna’s inappropriate behavior.  Supposedly, she showed her naked body to Michael Jackson, according to Mark Lester.  She should take at least some heat for that behavior if all these men were being dragged through the mud.  I think this was a turning point in movies.  I think this one changed things forever.  Vincent’s having to go to the toilet resulted in two disasters, first with Mia’s drug overdose and then with the encounter with Butch.  I wondered if he ate those Sams Frosted Cinnamon Toaster Pastries.  Lance was having a sugary cereal called Fruit Brute, I think, and he definitely wore a Speed Racer T-shirt.  Tarantino never matched what he did with this movie, and his last two haven’t had so much to offer.  I wish the ending were something different than those two leaving the coffee shop and putting their guns into their waistbands.  I noticed that the Los Angeles Police in this movie was unresponsive, considering the number of gunshots there were.  Were there any police at all in the movie?  We never got to see Bonnie.  I’m skeptical about Tarantino after seeing “The Hateful Eight.”  After I was done with the movie, I watched the end of Match Game 78 with Debralee Scott sitting in the lower left seat.  I received an e-mail to my feedback to KCSN about how difficult it has been to listen to their station over the Internet.  I received another e-mail about my lost AMC Stubs card.  I noted that it will be a little more than one week until I can see the new Star Wars movie.  Some of the people who died on December 6 include Leadbelly (1949), Roy Orbison (1988), Don Ameche (1993), Werner Klemperer (2000), and Dobie Gray (2011).  Today is a birthday for Judd Apatow (50) and Janine Turner (55).

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