GoldenEye

I watched the morning news and went out to the office to work. I didn’t get around to grading papers early in the morning. I returned home for lunch and a turkey sandwich. I got my free cone at Ben and Jerry’s. The wait wasn’t very long. I sent some papers to the insurance company and went back to the office to get some more work done. When three o’clock came around, I had the chance to make a change to my Raiders season ticket, and so I did. I thought it was a better seat worth the extra money. I met with students and gave a short lecture. I talked with the security guard about Michael Jackson and sports tickets. After watching a Big Bang Theory about Penny Blossoms, I finished watching “GoldenEye.” I thought that Pierce Brosnan had a forgettable entrance into the series because he went right to the toilet. The opening sequence wasn’t one of my favorites, with the motorcycle and the plane. I liked Judi Dench, and I would have liked Joe Don Baker more if he wasn’t trying to be funny. When Bond did the bungee jump, I thought he was going to smash into the dam. I liked Pierce Brosnan more than Timothy Dalton because Dalton was terrible. I thought that the success of this movie was due to the long wait since the previous one, and the audience being familiar with Brosnan from television. They were probably eager for the change. As far as the action sequences go, I liked the tank, although I had to wonder about the buildings that were being destroyed. I wouldn’t say that the bricks looked like Styrofoam, but they came apart pretty easily. How could Bond see to turn the tank sharply to avoid falling into the water? Somehow, I could not be impressed with the helicopter, and how Bond punched the eject button with his head. The villain never restrains him the way that he should. The bad guy reminded me of Kenneth Branagh. I didn’t like the idea of a hacker being the center of the action, although after “The Interview,” it seemed relevant. He was too much of a jerk. The whole plan with the money was not so fascinating. It was perhaps a step above breaking into the Target computer. Q had an amusing moment with a sandwich, but I could not laugh at Minnie Driver singing “Stand By Your Man.” I also didn’t like seeing another female character with a strange name. It reminded me too much of Austin Powers. I couldn’t get over how Bond just had to play a card game. Does his skill really mean anything at all? I would have thought that his gambling addiction would have brought him down. M calls Bond a dinosaur of the Cold War. His demeanor does seem from a different time, and he shows his unbearable obnoxious tendencies with his car at the beginning. It felt like a touch of “Goldfinger.” The interaction with Miss Moneypenny was not very enjoyable. I couldn’t see why Bond hadn’t been shot full of holes many times in this movie. Russian soldiers must be the worst in the world with their weapons. I didn’t pay attention to huge parts of the plot. Was it important at all? The women, Izabella Scorupco and Famke Janssen, were not the most memorable in a Bond movie. I tried to like the theme song because of Bono, The Edge, and Tina Turner, but I couldn’t help feeling that I missed the brassy sound of “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball.” I liked “GoldenEye” more than about half the Roger Moore Bond movies. I thought that Pierce Brosnan had more of a Bond look to him than George Lazenby did. I would say that I liked Pierce Brosnan more than Daniel Craig. I have the feeling that the next Bond film will not change my mind about Craig. I wanted to see Judi Dench continue. I watched the beginning of the Twilight Zone episode called “The Bewitchin’ Pool.” I thought that the parents should have been able to see the children disappear because water looked clean and clear. I watched a movie channel and saw Joanne Woodward and Lee J. Cobb. I liked the old movies in black and white, but I didn’t feel like watching this stuff all night. I saw Bruce Dern getting his hand chopped off. It seemed like a gruesome image for the old days, even if it looked fake. The cast was very good, with Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Joseph Cotten, Victor Buono, Mary Astor, Agnes Moorehead, George Kennedy, and Ellen Corby. It took a long time before the opening credits appeared, which was creepy. This was 1964, and Bette Davis was looking older than in the previous Robert Aldrich masterpiece. This was not one of Bette Davis’ Oscar caliber performances. She was out of control, but maybe she was enjoying it. Agnes Moorehead and Victor Buono were holdovers from “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” I couldn’t help thinking about how Joseph Cotten and Agnes Moorehead were both in “Citizen Kane.” Agnes Moorehead looked very different than Endora. Robert Aldrich made an impression on me with “Kiss Me Deadly.” I was starting to like this channel, which was 2.3. Well, I didn’t really like the commercial breaks. I saw an amusing montage of movie characters seeing movies, like out of “Play It Again, Sam,” “Annie,” and “The Last Picture Show.” I haven’t seen Olivia de Havilland in many movies. It’s incredible to me that she is still alive. I think I will always remember going to see “The Whales of August.” Bette Davis and Lillian Gish were still alive, but their days were coming to an end. I wonder what Bette Davis was like to deal with. She was frightening. Some of the people who died on April 15 include Abraham Lincoln (1865), Wallace Beery (1949), Raymond Bailey (1980), Jean-Paul Sartre (1980), Greta Garbo (1990), and Joey Ramone (2001). Today is a birthday for Seth Rogen (33), Emma Thompson (56), Claudia Cardinale (77), and Roy Clark (82). According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 15, Frank and Nancy Sinatra had the Number One hit, “Somethin’ Stupid,” in 1967. In 1988, the movie “Colors,” with Robert Duvall and Sean Penn, was released. Elizabeth Montgomery was born 82 years ago today.

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