Josh Reddick’s Four-Hit Game

I worked most of the morning preparing for my class. I heard that Burt Reynolds looked old and frail at a public appearance recently. The man is 79 years old, and he’s had health problems. It’s been more than 40 years since “Deliverance.” During my lunch hour, I watched a DVD of a Rolling Stones concert at the Inglewood Forum in 1975. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” went on for a long time. I handed out some papers to my class and left early. I took the train out to the Coliseum. There was no need to rush, because on a cold weeknight, the stadium was not going to be full, even though the opponent was the Red Sox. There were plenty of fleece blankets to go around. I was glad to get mine, because I would need it before the night was done. Vince Cotroneo on the radio kept using the word “heartbreak” in describing the A’s recent losses. Drew Pomeranz pitched an excellent first five innings, giving up only a single in the first inning. The runner was out trying to get to second base, as Coco Crisp made a good throw from left field. Good defensive plays would be a feature of this game for the home team, although Marcus Semien would make another error. The A’s scored first with runs in the bottom of the first inning. With one out, Semien tripled, and then scored on Josh Reddick’s single. After Billy Butler grounded out, Stephen Vogt hit a home run to make the score 3-0. In the second inning, Brett Lawrie singled, and he would score on Eric Sogard’s double. The bottom of the third inning began with Josh Reddick’s home run. After Butler made another out, Stephen Vogt walked, prompting the Red Sox to make a pitching change. Max Muncy walked and Lawrie singled to load the bases. Sam Fuld hit a fly ball to the shortstop for an out, but Sogard came through with another hit, driving in two runs, making the score 7-0. In the fourth inning, Semien hit a home run to make the score 8-0. It was looking like this game was a win for the A’s. During the break in the middle of the fifth inning, Ruby Lopez played Name That Tune with two fans. The girl came up with the name of the band, which was Journey, but when Ruby reminded her that she had to come up with the name of the tune, she blurted out a bad word. She obviously couldn’t control her mouth. It was “Don’t Stop Believin’,” of course. Pomeranz gave up a run in the sixth inning with a double and two ground outs. The result of the Big Head race was a win for Rollie Fingers. I wondered if the Big Heads struggled at all with the strong wind of the night. Pomeranz allowed another run in the seventh inning. The first batter singled and got to second base on that Semien error. The run came with a one-out single. Pomeranz got through the inning, though, to end his night. During the seventh inning stretch, we heard “Kung Fu Fighting.” Francisco Rodriguez pitched the top of the eighth inning and had a clean inning, ending with a strikeout. The A’s scored their last run of the game in the bottom of the inning. With two outs, Coco Crisp was still looking for his first hit of the season, but he did settle for a walk. Semien singled, moving Crisp to second base, and Reddick singled for another RBI and a 9-2 score. Butler was 0-for-4, and he was the only one of the A’s to not reach base. He grounded out to end the inning. Dan Otero came in to pitch the top of the ninth inning. The first out was a foul ball that Lawrie caught. The second out was a ground ball to Sogard. The game ended with a strikeout. I was glad that the game wasn’t one of those four-hour marathons because I was bundled up in my blanket and anxious to return home. The game began at 7:07 and ended at 9:39. Attendance was 24,605. We heard “Celebration” for the first time in quite a while. I rushed back to the train station while listening to the radio postgame show. I didn’t see any of the regulars in the stands on this night. We got to see a replay of Ernie Banks’ 500th home run, which came in 1970. I heard that Giancarlo Stanton hit a home run out of Dodger Stadium. I got home before eleven o’clock and ate a sandwich. I discovered that I had missed a phone call from the Raiders. It came at a bad time, at five o’clock. I went to the café for a pineapple smoothie and tried to do a little bit of work. I came up with the solution to a problem just before I went to bed. I was too tired to watch any of the late night television programs. The Rolling Stones DVD was too loud to watch at the late hour. Rock concerts were very different back in 1975. Bill Graham was there. I heard that the Rockets and the Cavaliers won their playoff games. It would be unusual to see the Clippers one round away from the championship series. In Dennis O’Donnell’s highlights of last night’s game, he showed Rickey Henderson in the A’s dugout, next to Reddick. The weather forecast were calling for rain coming here soon. I hoped it wouldn’t interfere with any of the games this weekend. I also wanted to see the new Mad Max movie. I wonder how Charlize Theron ended up in the movie. Some of the people who died on May 13 include Dan Blocker (1972), Bob Wills (1975), Chet Baker (1988), Paul Bartel (2000), Jason Miller (2001), and Donald “Duck” Dunn (2012). Today is a birthday for Stevie Wonder (65) and Harvey Keitel (76). According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for May 13, Yvonne Elliman reached Number One on the single chart with “If I Can’t Have You” in 1978. In 1993, the Simpsons episode “Krusty Gets Kancelled” aired, featuring guest stars Johnny Carson, Hugh Hefner, Bette Midler, Barry White, Luke Perry, Elizabeth Taylor, and Red Hot Chili Peppers. In 1994, Johnny Carson made his last television appearance on David Letterman’s show.

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