Fernando Rodriguez’s Error

I awoke later than usual for a Saturday morning, but I caught the chef segment of CBS This Morning. Some of Julian Medina’s signature dishes are Lechon prensado, tacos de langosta, vegetales en vinagre, corn-jalapeño pudding, guacamole de frutas, churros, and a margarita. On this morning, college students in town were packing up and leaving for the summer, or graduating. I saw a woman on a street corner selling orchid leis. I went over to the office to print out my final exam and take a look at the American Top 40 playlist for this weekend. The Top 10 songs on May 12, 1979 were “Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground),” “He’s the Greatest Dancer,” “Take Me Home,” “I Want Your Love,” “Goodnight Tonight,” “In the Navy,” “Stumblin’ In,” “Hot Stuff,” “Heart of Glass,” and “Reunited.” I heard that there was a Beatles fan event in Louisville, Kentucky next weekend. It’s too late for me to make plans to go there. I looked at one of my savings accounts and saw that there was $1772 more in it than two months ago. I bought some groceries, and I returned home to watch two Partridge Family episodes, “Bedknobs and Drumsticks” and “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex… but Couldn’t Pronounce.” I went over to the BART station and to the stadium. I craved some pizza but decided not to spend the seven dollars. I went to my seat and watched the obnoxious autograph seekers. Jesse Chavez was the starting pitcher for the A’s. He got through the first inning without allowing any runs, although he did give up one hit. Things looked promising in the bottom of the inning when Marcus Semien singled with one out and Billy Butler hit a home run with two outs. Chavez almost gave up a run in the second inning. He allowed a double to the first batter, and then a single to the next batter. The runner didn’t score because he got into a rundown. The play went 9-2-5-2. Chavez got the next two batters out to end the inning. Chavez ran into trouble in the top of the third inning. After one out, Chavez allowed two singles. He struck out the next batter, but then allowed a walk and a single that tied the game at 2-2. He had a clean fourth inning. A double play got him out of the fifth inning. In the sixth inning, he allowed a single and a walk, and threw two wild pitches, but another double play helped him keep the score at 2-2. After the first inning, the A’s didn’t do much over the next six innings. Brett Lawrie hit a double to lead off the second inning, and Lawrie, Mark Canha and Stephen Vogt walked in different innings, and that was it. The Big Head race had the three runners with capes because it was Superhero Fireworks Night. The winner was Rollie Fingers with a late push past Rickey Henderson. Dennis Eckersley only wins when the other two let him win. In the top of the seventh inning, Fernando Rodriguez replaced Chavez. He got the first two outs rather quickly, but then on an infield hit, Rodriguez made a bad throw to first, allowing the runner to go all the way to third base. A single put the White Sox ahead 3-2, and a double made the score 4-3. Fernando Abad came in to finish the inning. The crowd booed another seventh inning disaster. During the seventh inning stretch, we heard “Livin’ on a Prayer.” The A’s went down quietly in the bottom of the seventh inning. Edward Mujica allowed two singles in the top of the eighth inning, but he got out of the inning without giving up any runs. The A’s started the bottom of the inning with singles from Billy Burns and Marcus Semien, but Josh Reddick hit into a double play, although Semien scored on the play to bring the A’s within one run. After a pitching change, Butler singled, and after a second pitching change, Vogt followed with another single. After a third pitching change in this inning, Lawrie lined out. In the top of the ninth inning, Dan Otero came into the game to pitch. Coco Crisp made a good catch on a foul ball. Otero hit a batter with a pitch so that the inning wasn’t quite a clean one. Later in the game, the fan who always dresses in the white suit stopped by my seat to introduce himself to me, telling me that he sees me frequently at the games. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Coco Crisp lined out to left field, and Mark Canha flied out to right. The fan brought out his eyeglass frame and said, “We need Nerdpower!” However, Sogard flied out to center to end the game. It was the A’s 25th loss of the season. The end began at 6:07 and ended at 9:13. I got in line at the gate to the field. Attendance was 28,445. One amusing thing we saw for Superhero Fireworks Night was the superhero graphics for each of the A’s players up on the scoreboard: Billy Burns (Human Torch), Marcus Semien (Green Lantern), Josh Reddick (Spider-Man), Billy Butler (Thor), Stephen Vogt (Hulk), Brett Lawrie (Daredevil), Coco Crisp (Flash), Mark Canha (Captain America), Eric Sogard (Cyclops), and Jesse Chavez (Iron Man). I took a seat on the grass near the A’s dugout and wished I’d brought my blanket. We heard music associated with Teenage Mutant Teenage Turtles, Spider-Man, Flash Gordon, and Superman. I listened to the A’s fans calling into the postgame radio show as I left the stadium. When I got home, I ate some fruit and saw that the movie of the night on KQED was “The Graduate.” I saw a scene with Norman Fell. Some of the people who died on May 17 include Sandro Botticelli (1510), Paul Dukas (1935), Johnny “Guitar” Watson (1996), Dave Berg (2002), Frank Gorshin (2005), Lloyd Alexander (2007), and Donna Summer (2012). Today is a birthday for Trent Reznor (50), Craig Ferguson (53), Bob Saget (59), and Bill Paxton (60). According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for May 17, the Fifth Dimension’s “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)” was the Number One single in 1969. In 1975, Mick Jagger smashed his hand through a window in Gorman’s restaurant in Long Island, and he required twenty stitches. In 1992, Lawrence Welk died at age 89 in his apartment in Santa Monica. In 2004, Tony Randall died at age 84 in his sleep in New York.

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