Deadpool

Andrew Carmellini visited CBS This Morning to do the chef segment. Some of his signature dishes are rack of lamb glazed with citrus and vinegar, spaghetti squash with sage and walnuts, brussels sprouts with pancetta and pecorino, his grandmother’s ravioli, root beer cake, and epice and pomme. I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend. The Top 10 songs on February 12, 1977 were “Lost Without Your Love,” “I Like Dreamin’,” “I Wish,” “Enjoy Yourself,” “Dazz,” “Love Theme from ‘A Star is Born’ (Evergreen),” “Car Wash,” “Blinded by the Light,” “New Kid in Town,” and “Torn Between Two Lovers.” I did my work for four hours and returned home to take a nap. I took the bus over to the Grand Lake Theatre where “Deadpool” was showing. From the start, I felt that everyone in the audience was laughing too loudly at things that were only slightly amusing. It seemed like they had seen too many superhero movies over the years. I thought Deadpool had the costume of Kickass, the personality of Jim Carrey, and the look of Brett Favre. Deadpool uses R-rated language, and his actions go beyond the typical Marvel superhero actions in the level of violence. This is a movie that is definitely not for the very young. We see a breaking down of the fourth wall, which I’m not so sure is a great idea. The violence is disturbing, as it was in “Sin City.” Stan Lee makes his usual cameo appearance, and it was a bit more of an edge to it than usual. I had wondered what Leslie Uggams had been doing for all these years, and then she pops up in this movie. The audience clearly liked this movie more than I did. Maybe I’m not hip anymore. I thought about “Kingsmen” as I watched this movie. I missed a lot of the dialogue because the audience was laughing so loudly. The one joke that made me laugh had to do with Hugh Jackman. I didn’t care about the references to Green Lantern or the producers of the movie. This movie seemed like a hit based on how people were reacting to it, although I was not quite as enthusiastic about it because of the violence. Three of the songs on the soundtrack were “Angel of the Morning,” “Calendar Girl,” and “Careless Whisper.” As with all other Marvel movies, this one has a bit after the end credits have rolled, although it was done in the style of Ferris Bueller. I wondered how some of these couples in the theatre could want to see a movie like this on the day before Valentine’s Day. Well, looking back on it, it did seem like a sort of warped love story. I took the buses back home and found the line for burritos too long, and so I bought a burger. I watched the Tonight Show with Mel Brooks talking about Gene Wilder and showing outtakes from “Young Frankenstein.” I was going to watch the Star Trek episode on Me TV, but then I went back to the fourth episode of Ingmar Bergman’s “Face to Face” to see it again. I’m almost satisfied at what I’ve absorbed from watching the Swedish television version. The scene with the daughter was very curious. I didn’t have the energy to stay up and watch the Saturday night television shows. “Alien” was on KQED. I didn’t want to see what they might have edited out in order to show it on television. I didn’t want to think about the future of the Supreme Court after the death of Antonin Scalia. Some of the people who died on February 14 include McLean Stevenson (1996), Doug Fieger (2010), and George Shearing (2011). Today is a birthday for Simon Pegg (46), Teller (68), and Florence Henderson (82). According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for February 14, David Bowie collapsed at the end of his show at Radio City Music Hall in New York in 1973. In 1974, the Captain and Tennille, Daryl Dragon and Toni Tennille, were married in Virginia City, Nevada. In 1977, the B-52’s performed their first show at a party in Athens, Georgia. In 1999, Buddy Knox, known for the hit song “Party Doll,” died of lung cancer at age 65 in Bremerton, Washington.

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