Vargtimmen

I watched CBS Sunday Morning, and I didn’t get a phone call from my parents. I discovered that my phone was dead, so I used my other phone, the cell phone, to call them. I went out to Trader Joe’s because of the break in the rain, and then I took the bus out to Jack London Square to see “Kung Fu Panda 3” again. Most people were there to see “Zootopia.” I watched Maria Menounos talk about herself as someone who lost 40 pounds on a diet. I thought the movie was rather unexciting the second time, and I didn’t see how they could come up with three more sequels. I would think that we’re going to get tired of the concept long before then. I had spent a good portion of the weekend watching animated movies, and I thought that the return on my money was rather modest. I took the bus home and browsed through the record store and bought the Blu-ray Criterion Collection edition of “The Tin Drum.” I bought a chorizo burrito and went home. I watched the DVD of Ingmar Bergman’s “Hour of the Wolf.” It starts with Liv Ullmann’s character Alma breaking down the fourth wall and addressing the audience directly. I noticed that this scene is filmed on a windy day with her hair blowing around. At first I thought I was watching the wrong film. I thought it was “Shame” or something like that, and I had to the disc out of the player and look at the label again before I was satisfied. This film has some things in common with “Persona,” and it does mention Mozart’s “The Magic Flute.” Max von Sydow is Alma’s artist husband Johan, who is going insane. Max von Sydow is very good in this film. I liked the scene with him showing his drawings of the island’s characters to Alma. Some of this movie is about the artist and the audience. Johan talks about a punishment of being locked in a closet, and his father’s religion. Liv Ullmann reminded me a bit of Sissy Spacek. The shots of the windy outdoors made everything feel cold. Alma is pregnant, so this story made me think of “Rosemary’s Baby.” One of the scenes that you can’t forget is the fight with the boy, which you can’t tell is real. That boy reminded me of a boy who appeared in “Persona.” A question Alma has is if a wife can become like her husband from living closely with him and trying to sympathize with him and understand him. This is an unusual kind of horror film. One of Alma’s painful scenes is her discussion of the budget. If feels like the marriage is coming apart. One circular shot made me think of Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters.” This film was more interesting than I thought it was going to be. The hour of the wolf is the hour of the day when more death occurs than any other hour. The audio commentary does tell us some interesting things, like Ingmar Bergman’s fear of humiliation. The knight from “The Seventh Seal” ended up with ridiculous makeup on his face. I think that the hour of the wolf does affect me, because I can’t stay asleep during that hour of the night. In one of the special features, Liv Ullmann said that the original script was called “The Cannibals.” She also said that she liked the beginning of the film, with her dialogue addressed to the audience. The one similar scene that I always remember was with Peter Finch in “Sunday Bloody Sunday.” I still think that Bergman was an inventive film director compared to the directors we see today. If Bergman made a film of “The Magic Flute,” I think I should have made a film of “The Marriage of Figaro.” I listened to the Robert Hilburn Rock ‘n’ Roll Times program on KCSN. He played songs by people whose birthdays were in March, including Elton John, Chris Martin, Sly Stone, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, and Eric Clapton. I thought about how “Tumbleweed Connection” was such a good album. I watched the Tonight Show rerun from March 6, 1973, with Dom DeLuise, Sally Kellerman, and Ronnie Schell. The songs “Everyday People” and “This Train” were great ones. I thought it was kind of amusing how Sally Kellerman talked about “Lost Horizon,” which would turn out to be one of the worst movie of all time. She was also in “Slither.” I thought maybe she should have done another movie with Robert Altman. She spilled ice in her lap. One of the things I will remember her for is her Star Trek appearance. It’s too bad that she wore an old, baggy uniform in that episode. The Columbo episode was “The Bye-Bye Sky High I.Q. Murder Case.” Theodore Bikel and Jamie Lee Curtis appeared in the episode. Samantha Eggar was also in the cast, and she was once in “Doctor Dolittle.” I heard that the Warriors played a poor game against the Lakers in losing their sixth game of the season. The fans who were so enthusiastic at the beginning of the day were largely quiet about this loss. Kobe Bryant scored only 12 points. We heard the news of the death of Nancy Reagan at age 94. The radio reporter said that the assassination attempt happened in 1991, which of course was incorrect. It was in 1981. That really seems like a long time ago now, a good 35 years. I wonder what Nancy Reagan thought of the Republican Party during those last days of her life. It wouldn’t necessarily be a disaster for them if Donald Trump is the candidate. I heard the rain falling outside and thought that I could stand this weather throughout March, but I would like it all to stop by April. I wonder if Billy Beane and Buster Posey have done anything to stop wasting water. I took a photo of my friend’s Super Bowl ticket and sent it to him. I guess this was meaningful on the day when we heard about the retirement of Peyton Manning. He still has so much of his life ahead of him. I hope he doesn’t use the free time to promote conservative causes and discuss Christianity. I wasn’t quite ready for the new work week. Some of the people who died on March 7 include Divine (1988), Stanley Kubrick (1999), Charles Gray (2000), Paul Winfield (2004), Gordon Park (2006), and Jimmy Boyd (2009). Today is a birthday for Rachel Weisz (46), Wanda Sykes (52), Bryan Cranston (60), Lynn Swann (64), Franco Harris (66), and John Heard (71).

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