Everest

After I got back from my shopping, I heard the sports scores, with the Cowboys winning again, and the Steelers doing well.  I watched the movie “Everest” on Blu-ray, and I discovered that it wasn’t the greatest holiday movie.  It was rather compelling, though, and it made me think about the meaning of my life goals.  I know that I wouldn’t want to do anything dangerous.  I don’t understand those 100-year-old people who want to try skydiving.  I can’t stand being out in cold weather, and I can’t see the attraction of mountain climbing.  I wouldn’t want to risk my life on ropes, oxygen tanks, and the weather.  The cast includes people like Josh Brolin, Keira Knightley, and Jake Gyllenhaal.  I’ve come to think that when I see Josh Brolin’s name in the credits, it’s usually a good movie.  I could imagine Nick Nolte in his role if this movie had been made years ago.  The movie becomes a tense survival story when the snowstorm approaches.  I thought it was so foolish for these climbers to not promptly head back down the mountain.  When they show the first signs of sickness or weakness, they shouldn’t go any further.  One of the expedition leaders shouldn’t have allowed one of the climbers to continue, and that appeared to be a fatal decision.  What is more important, a dream or a life?  How terribly helpless it must be to talk on the phone with a loved one who is freezing to death on Mount Everest.  I think back on the end of Robert Altman’s “McCabe and Mrs. Miller.”  The Brolin character had a story that was remarkable, something along the lines of “127 Hours.”  I kept thinking about how I would face the situation.  Setting aside the fact that I wouldn’t be there in the first place, the lack of oxygen would make me lose consciousness, and I would die quickly.  I’m just not a survivor in those types of situations.  I wonder how difficult it was to make this movie.  Jake Gyllenhaal has played some unusual characters in his recent movies, but I would say that this was his best role in a while.  It was better to see him in this film than in “Nightcrawler.”  This movie makes you think about life and death, and it does pack a powerful punch.  There was a beauty to the images that was frightening.  I preferred this movie over something like “The Revenant.”  It is so very disturbing to think that dead bodies are still up there on Mount Everest.  I kept wondering whether technology could help them survive.  It was sad to think of the people who achieved what they set out, only to die coming down the mountain.  This was taking place in 1996, the same year as “The End of the Tour.”  I heard the news that Florence Henderson, who was Carol Brady of “The Brady Bunch,” had died yesterday at age 82.  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for November 25, John Lennon returned his MBE medal as a protest against the British government.  The Band performed for the last time at the Winterland in San Francisco in 1976, documented in “The Last Waltz.”  In 1992, Whitney Houston’s “The Bodyguard” was released nationally.

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