Paterson

I watched the CBS This Morning program and its chef segment.  Some of Kris Morningstar’s signature recipes include Brine and roasted whole duck with anise, Beet salad with blood orange, Brussels sprouts with scallion vinaigrette, Roasted carrots with honey and Worcestershire, Baumkuchen, and East India Manhattan.  I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on January 12, 1974 were “Helen Wheels,” “Let Me Be There,” “Living for the City,” “Never, Never Gonna Give You Up,” “You’re Sixteen,” “I’ve Got to Use My Imagination,” “Smokin’ in the Boys Room,” “Show and Tell,” “Time in a Bottle,” and “The Joker.”  I went out to do some work for five hours.  I heard the news about the Raiders preparing to move to Las Vegas and felt disgusted with the NFL.  I did watch a little bit of the Falcons game before heading to the theatre to see “Paterson,” the latest Jim Jarmusch film.  I enjoyed watching “Stranger Than Paradise” and “Down By Law” years ago.  This movie didn’t have a story, but it had a setting and a set of characters.  Paterson was both a city and New Jersey, and a person, a bus driver played by Adam Driver, known to a lot of us as Kylo Ren from Star Wars.  Paterson walks with a lunchbox to work, and it feels like he’s from another decade.  He doesn’t carry a smart phone with him, and he carries a notebook with him to write down his poems.  Williams Carlos Williams is one of his influences.  He overhears people’s conversations and looks out for poetry in this town, from a young girl waiting for her mother to some guy rapping in a laundromat.  Sometimes in the bus the shots are from his point of view as a driver, and we feel like we’re in the bus.  His wife is Laura, who cooks a pie with cheddar cheese and brussel sprouts one day, leading to a little bit of suspense when she goes to sell a large batch of cupcakes.  She’s also interested in singing country songs in the vein of Tammy Wynette and Patsy Cline.  I wondered if she was aware of the world out there, but she does suggest to Paterson that he get a cell phone for emergencies.  Marvin the bulldog is an important character, too, as he seems to be an honest critic of Paterson’s poetry, or is it just that he resents being left alone?  I thought the movie moved along rather slowly, even considering the content and the fact that it was a Jim Jarmusch film.  The poetry didn’t inspire me.  I liked the atmosphere and the observations of people.  We all deal with co-workers who complain.  Paterson seems passive, and it he wasn’t so good-natured, he would be doing something besides driving a bus and writing poetry.  I could see him getting dissatisfied with his wife.  When the bartender talked about how Bud Abbott was the most famous person to come out of Paterson, I thought about Oakland.  On this Martin Luther King holiday weekend, this is actually a pretty good movie to watch, because it shows a diverse group of people and makes no big deal about it.  It’s worth a look.  The showing started at 4:15, and I left the theatre at 6:16.  I went home to eat oranges and watch the second half of the Patriots and Texans.  I have to give the Patriots credit for being so good, even though I’m sick of them.  I heard about the death of Dick Gautier.  I’ll remember him for those Get Smart episodes.  I also heard about the end of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey.  I watched about a minute of the Star Trek episode on Me TV before realizing that I was too tired to continue watching television.  Some of the people who died on January 16 include Amilcare Ponchielli (1886), Léo Delibes (1891), Carole Lombard (1942), Arturo Toscanini (1957), Ted Cassidy (1979), Bernard Lee (1981), Ron Carey (2007), Russell Johnson (2014) and Dave Madden (2014).  Today is a birthday for Debbie Allen (67) and John Carpenter (69).

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