Colossal

I watched CBS This Morning and the chef segment.  Matthew Kenney’s signature recipes include Sunflower pest pizza with cooked onion, confit tomato and herb macadamia ricotta, Flora artisanal cheese tasting, Roasted cauliflower, green harissa and pomegranate, and Yuzu guacamole.  I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on April 30, 1977 were “Trying to Love Two,” “Sir Duke,” “Right Time of the Night,” “So Into You,” “Don’t Give Up on Us,” “I’ve Got Love on My Mind,” “When I Need You,” “Don’t Leave Me This Way,” “Hotel California,” and “Southern Nights.”  I went out to the theatre to see “Colossal,” the very unusual movie starring Anne Hathaway.  It was part monster movie, part comedy, and part drama.  It was funny to see the monster and the robot doing weird things in front of the world.  The thought of a monster dancing like Uma Thurman in “Pulp Fiction” was amusing.  The audience on this afternoon did enjoy some of the absurd moments, as I heard some laughter.  Almost all of the monster action, oddly enough, takes place in Seoul, South Korea.  It might have been more interesting if it had been North Korea.  I wondered if the scenes were designed the way they were in order to save money.  It seemed ridiculous to see two people stomping around on a plain surface.  A couple of times, I thought the extras did some bad acting.  It was the dramatic part of the movie that was about the controlling Oscar that was the part I didn’t like so much.  It dragged the story on, making this movie feel like it was going on for too long.  I would say that it was one of those instances where the people making the film tried to do too much.  I wonder what Anne Hathaway’s input into the content of the movie was.  All in all, though, I liked the offbeat quality of the movie.  It made me think of Jonathan Demme and “Something Wild” in its strangeness.  “Colossal” looks like one of those movies that will get one of those cult followings and hang around in people’s consciousness for years to come.  It puzzled the two girls who sat in front of me, as they said they didn’t know whether to laugh at what was going on.  That was the point.  The movie was something of a litmus test of your character, and whether you had any real sense of humor.  Some of the people who died on April 30 include Edouard Manet (1883), Inger Stevens (1970), Agnes Moorehead (1974), Lester Bangs (1982), Muddy Waters (1983), Sergio Leone (1989), Richard Scarry (1994), Tom Poston (2007), and Ben E. King (2015).  Today is a birthday for Cloris Leachman (91).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for April 30, organist Al Kooper of Blood, Sweat & Tears announced that he was leaving the band in 1968.  In 1983, Muddy Waters died following a heart attack at age 68.  Ellen DeGeneres’ character in the television show “Ellen” came out in 1997.  Also in 1997, Frank Gifford was caught on videotape with flight attendant Suzen Johnson at the Regency Hotel in Manhattan.

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