Professor Marston and the Wonder Women

I woke up and watched CBS This Morning and their chef segment.  Some of Diane Kochilas’ signature recipes include Classic Greek lamb chops, Braised octopus with olives, “Little Shoes”: Eggplant halves baked with three cheeses and tomato, and Shrimp Saganaki.  The musical guest was Bill Murray, who sang a Van Morrison song.  I looked up the American Top 40 playlist for the weekend.  The Top 10 songs on October 18, 1975 were “Who Loves You,” “They Just Can’t Help It (Games People Play),” “Ain’t No Way to Treat a Lady,” “Feelings,” “Dance with Me,” “Ballroom Blitz,” “Lyin’ Eyes,” “Miracles,” “Calypso,” and “Bad Blood.”  I went out to work for six hours.  I tried to get to the theatre where “Take Every Wave” was showing with the Q&A afterwards, but I got to the box office too late, and tickets were sold out.  I settled for “Professor Marston and the Wonder Women” across the street.  It was interesting to see this movie several months after the popular Wonder Woman movie that was so popular.  Marston was a psychology professor, and his comic book attempted to promote his views.  He was also the inventor of the lie detector, which seemed to reveal a lot about himself.  The relationship he had with his wife and his student was something of a variation on Jules and Jim.  Rebecca Hall was the wife Elizabeth.  I didn’t see her as having any kind of appealing personality that could inspire such great emotion.  Olive, the student, reminded me of Heather Graham from “Boogie Nights.”  Marston was fired from his academic position and struggled to find something new as Elizabeth went on to work as a secretary, and Olive gave birth.  I don’t know why these three would leave the door open for any snooping neighbors to walk in on what they were doing.  They really could have used the home schooling idea back then.  It’s funny to think how the images in the Wonder Woman comic book were cleaned up from pornography showing bondage and submission.  I can see how it fit into the world of comic books and pulp paperbacks, which had a low appeal with busty women and crime.  I wondered how the producers of the movie came up with the comic books that people burned.  It brought back the memory of people burning Beatles albums after John Lennon’s famous Jesus remark.  Marston reminded me of Michael Shannon, the actor who was in “Hell or High Water” and “Elvis and Nixon.”  The movie didn’t go enough into the creation into the comic book.  I liked what I saw in “American Splendor” by comparison.  One of the meaningful moments was one of the children coming from home school after getting into a fight over rumors about his family.  It was rather predictable, as a lot of this movie was, despite its outrageous surface.  When Marston starts coughing, you know what his fate is.  I flashed back to Johnny Depp in “Finding Neverland.”  One of the trailers we saw was for that movie about Christopher Robin.  All of these movies are related to each other.  I did like the scene with Marston playing with his plane with the kids, reminding me of old times before electronic toys and devices.  It seemed to imply that these activities stimulated Marston’s imagination in a way that you don’t see these days.  Olive lived on until 1985.  I kept wondering what she thought of the Wonder Woman television series, and what Lynda Carter thought of this movie.  The audience did laugh at some things, like the explanation of the premise of the Wonder Woman comic book, but the movie seemed to fall short of expectations.  I would have to say that I thought the more could have been done with the concept.  I walked over to Dollar Tree to buy some batteries, and then I headed home to listen to the Dodgers and Cubs game on the radio.  I thought the Cubs would have one last rally to get close to tying the score, but it didn’t happen.  Meanwhile, the Yankees didn’t do their part in making the matchup with the Dodgers possible.  1981 now feels like a long time ago.  I saw “12 Angry Men” on KQED.  I thought about how some people have a fantasy that they see things more clearly than eleven other people and are persuasive enough to convince everyone else about their point of view.  Professor Marston may have been one of that type.  Some of the people who died on October 15 include Cole Porter (1964), Frank DeKova (1981), Delphine Seyrig (1990), and Jack Narz (2008).  Today is a birthday for Tanya Roberts (62), Tito Jackson (64), Penny Marshall (74), and Linda Lavin (80).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 15, the last Otis Redding studio album, “Complete & Unbelievable: The Otis Redding Dictionary of Soul,” was released in 1966.  In 1967, “Bonnie and Clyde” was Number One at the box office.  In 1985, a black and white episode of “Moonlighting” with an introduction by Orson Welles aired on ABC five days after Welles’ death.

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Golden State Warriors 117, Sacramento Kings 106

Instead of watching the news, I watched the Partridge Family episode “See Here, Private Partridge.”  Shirley Jones’ strong suit in acting is not expressing anger.  I’d like to take a close look at what was supposed to be the Partridge Family’s first album.  It sure didn’t take too long between the recording sessions and the pressing.  Keith was in the background in this story.  I smelled the smoke in the air and thought it was going to be a bad day.  I shopped at Trader Joe’s and took the bus over to Emeryville, where I saw “Blade Runner 2049” again.  I liked how Ryan Gosling had to do the physical stuff, namely the fighting, while Harrison Ford sat down, although it was in cold water.  I took the bus back home so that I could have a late lunch.  I browsed through the record stores and found a couple of records I wanted to buy, but I put it off.  I didn’t want to use up all my cash before the Warriors game.  I took BART over to the Oracle Arena.  There were a lot of people already lined up to get into the building because of the giveaway, the Kevin Durant bobblehead.  The two people behind me in line talked about the 49ers and having to take care of grandparents in Taiwan.  I had arrived at about five o’clock, and in half an hour, it looked like a thousand fans had gotten in line behind me.  I was just glad to get my bobblehead.  This was the first time I had been in the Oracle Arena since Game 5 of the NBA Finals, and it was the first NBA preseason I was going to see.  I walked in a big circle to get to the team store, where the item of the night was a victory parade T-shirt for $10.  I bought one of those, along with a lanyard.  They had popcorn buckets for $15.  I thought of buying one, but how much popcorn was I going to eat all by myself?  I took my seat and watched Franco Finn.  We saw some video of the Warriors’ trip to China.  It looks like the team has a lot of fans in other countries.  It appeared that we were going to get only one half of Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, and no Kevin Durant and no Draymond Green.  There were empty seats for this game against the Sacramento Kings.  Curry scored his share of points, and we saw the dance cam, which caught the woman with the glittery Warriors outfit who always draws applause.  The Warriors were two points ahead after one quarter at 26-24.  You can count on seeing at least a couple of bad passes from the Warriors, and on this night we would see Zaza Pachulia and Klay Thompson make them.  We saw the obligatory marriage proposal, although what was different from usual was that it was the woman who did the proposing.  If I were in his place, I would have said no.  The Kings cut into the lead and were behind by only three points at halftime, 54-51.  A team of kids took the court, and the fans had a favorite, the smallest kid on the court, who wore number 22.  By the end, the crowd was chanting “Twenty-two!”  The stars didn’t play in the second half, although Sean Livingston was out there.  Nick Young scored more points in the second half.  We saw a dance-off between two women who were trying to win Pink tickets.  The concert wasn’t going to happen until May.  The third quarter ended with the Warriors ahead by three points, 84-81.  The Warriors pulled away in the fourth quarter, pushing their lead to fifteen points.  The final score was 117-106.  I thought about whether I should return to the arena for Arcade Fire.  I was happy to return home.  I heard that the Astros had won Game 1 with the Yankees.  Also, California had gone ahead with their game in the smoky air against Washington State, and they actually won easily.  Washington State was supposed to be a Top 10 team, but I thought that they couldn’t have been that good if Cal could win by 34 points.  Some of the people who died on October 14 include Errol Flynn (1959), Bing Crosby (1977), Keenan Wynn (1986), Leonard Bernstein (1990), Harold Robbins (1997), Freddy Fender (2006), Sigrid Valdis (2007), and Elizabeth Peña (2014).  Today is a birthday for Steve Coogan (52), Cliff Richard (77), and Ralph Lauren (78).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 14, Bing Crosby died in Spain at age 74 of a heart attack after he had finished a round of golf.  In 1982, “It Takes Two,” starring Richard Crenna, Patty Duke Astin, and Helen Hunt, premiered on ABC.  In 1983, Sam Peckinpah’s final film, “The Osterman Weekend,” was released.

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Les quatre cents coups

I overheard some English teachers talking about their students, saying that many of them were lacking motivation and a good work ethic.  I gave an exam to my late class and went out to buy a California burrito before going home and watching “The 400 Blows” again, this time on the Criterion Collection Blu-ray edition.  Even with the high definition, it doesn’t quite have the impact it does in a movie theatre on a big screen.  I always thought back to the moment when Antoine’s father slaps him right in front of all his classmates as one of the most powerful moments in the film.  This was the first time I’ve seen this film since Jeanne Moreau’s death, so I took notice of her camera, in which she is looking for a dog.  She walks away from the camera.  I liked one of the shots in which Antoine runs down some steps, and we see a view of Paris.  It’s also hard to forget his theft of a bottle of milk, although his behavior is incredibly conspicuous and suspicious.  Antoine gets slapped twice, and I think he goes to the movies three times.  The one happy scene is the family’s return from the movie “Paris Belongs to Us.”  Antoine says that he had strawberry ice cream for the first time.  The kids steal a lot of money in this film.  I thought of the poor teacher whose students ditched him, perhaps except for the final two trailing him.  Truffaut’s cameo comes at the carnival ride, and I noticed that at the end of the last shot, he is lighting a cigarette.  Why are these kids so anxious to smoke?  Antoine’s theft of the very heavy typewriter shows that he isn’t a mastermind, and he made the mistake of putting it back where he got it instead of hightailing it out of there.  His lack of concentration in school spills over into real life.  The attitude of his parents doesn’t help, as he’s told not to do homework at the table, and his mother comments that algebra and science are useless subjects.  The Michelin guide seems to be a valuable commodity in this little world.  The times when Antoine displays strong emotional reactions are rather interesting.  There was the happiness during the carnival ride and with the parents after the movie, and the panic of the Balzac shrine catching fire, and the sadness with tears streaming from his eyes in the police van, and the sly smile when asked about girls.  His face is without expression after the two times he is slapped across the face.  You have to give credit to Jean-Pierre Léaud for giving a good performance at such a young age, and helping this film be a success.  I did notice that there were no young girls in the story.  It was as if no one in all of Paris had a daughter.  I read through Roger Ebert’s review of the movie on August 8, 1999, mentioning in the last two paragraphs “Small Change” and “The Green Room.”  I’d like to go back and see “The Green Room” again, as I always think back on people who have died.  Some of the people who died on October 13 include Claudius (54 AD), Millard Mitchell (1953), Clifton Webb (1966), Ed Sullivan (1974), Henry Roth (1995), and Jean Peters (2000).  Today is a birthday for Nancy Kerrigan (48), Jerry Rice (55), Marie Osmond (58), Sammy Hagar (70), and Paul Simon (76).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 13, “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” was the Number One movie at the box office in 1969.  In 1979, Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” hit Number One on the singles chart.  In 1984, Stevie Wonder had the Number One single, “I Just Called to Say I Love You.”  In 2004, the Internal Revenue Service charged Ronald Isley with five counts of tax evasion, for which he would eventually serve three years in prison.

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Star Wars: The Force Awakens

I arrived at work with a heavy backpack, and there was a big fan blowing the smoky air away from the desk.  I worked on for six hours and was glad to leave.  I stopped for a burger and then headed home to watch a little bit of Match Game before I watched the Blu-ray disc of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.”  I think it was the first time I had seen it since January 2016, and I was mixing some of my memories of it with the Rogue One movie.  I can’t deny that Daisy Ridley showed a star quality throughout the movie.  The action moves so quickly that you don’t really stop to think about the very unlikely coincidences that happen.  Maybe it’s all a result of The Force.  Since this movie’s release, it seems that I have seen more than I want to of Adam Driver, in “Paterson,” “Silence,” and “Logan Lucky.”  The one thing that Rey did that seemed too unlikely was using the door to save Finn.  Again, though, The Force explains a lot of things in Star Wars movies.  She thought that Han Solo had made the Kessel Run in fourteen parsecs when in reality it was twelve.  How could she have all this technical knowledge in her head and be off by two whole parsecs?  Even your average Star Wars fan could have gotten that fact right.  Oscar Isaac as Poe didn’t really inspire me.  Han Solo’s last scene is still shocking and depressing after nearly forty years of memories.  At his age, though, he shouldn’t be continuing with the Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Blade Runner movies.  Did Mark Hamill really earn one million dollars for just lowering his hood and looking into the camera, not saying anything?  That must have been the greatest acting performance in a movie, ever.  There was Carrie Fisher, affected by the passing of time, from 1983 to 2015.  She will be in this year’s Star Wars movie.  You have to wonder if they’re going to deal with her death in the next film.  It was exhausting to see this movie again.  I appreciate how it had energy and a better story than anything in the second trilogy, although it recycled some elements that we liked from the past.  It did give us Rey and BB-8.  I’m not looking forward to more of Kylo Ren, and I definitely don’t want to see Hayden Christensen again.  I thought back to the summer of 1977, with Fleetwood Mac songs on the radio and everyone going out to see the first Star Wars movie.  My older brother loved the first Star Wars movie, and he told me about going to a Star Wars convention where Carrie Fisher made an appearance.  My brother didn’t live to see Episode VII.  I liked he would have liked the movie, although nothing could match those memories of the movies from around 1972 through 1981.  Some of the people who died on October 12 include Tom Mix (1940), Sonja Henie (1969), Gene Vincent (1971), Johnny Olson (1989), John Denver (1997), Wilt Chamberlain (1999), Willie Shoemaker (2003), and Joan Leslie (2015).  Today is a birthday for Hugh Jackman (49).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 12, The Beatles recorded their song “Run for Your Life” in five takes in 1965.  In 1966, Sammy Davis, Jr.  appeared in the Batman episode “The Clock King’s Crazy Crimes.”  In 1969, DJ Russ Gibb WKNR in Detroit received a phone call telling him that John Lennon says “I buried Paul” at the end of “Strawberry Fields Forever,” fueling rumors about the death of Paul McCartney.

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Enter the Dragon

I had a long and draining day of work.  I had to go through an evaluation, which was highly stressful.  I stopped for a slice of pizza, then went home to watch “Enter the Dragon” on Blu-ray.  I would say that it did good better than the DVD I saw the last time.  I wondered what John Saxon has been doing in recent years.  When I look at his credits, it looks like his last notable film was “From Dusk till Dawn.”  I guess the important thing in this movie was that he looked like he could fight.  He is 82 years old now.  From what I read about Jim Kelly, he kept on with films through 1982, when his appearances tapered off.  His last movie was “Afro Ninja” in 2009, and he died of cancer at age 67 at his home in San Diego in 2013.  Bruce Lee was Lee, appropriately enough.  I thought the scene with the crowd applauding every blow was funny.  He got the chance to display his quickness and skills, with the camera zooming in on his facial expressions.  The villain had shades of Dr. No with a fake hand and operating from an island.  I thought that this guy was too slow to deal with Lee no matter what kind of blades he used.  The question was why he didn’t simply use a gun, a kind of Indiana Jones question.  I wondered about Ahna Capri, who was in “Payday” with Rip Torn.  She got into a car accident in 2010 and spent eleven days in a coma before she died at age 66.  The fight scene with the mirrors reminded a lot of people of “The Lady from Shanghai,” although supposedly it was inspired by a restaurant with mirrors.  Jackie Chan appeared as one of the guards who briefly attempts to fight Lee.  It ended with another one of those zoom shots.  One thing that is noticeable is the dubbing of dialogue, as the movie was filmed without sound.  That’s too bad.  Lee’s character is overwhelming, as Roper and Williams barely have skills compared to him.  You can’t say that Lee escapes without a scratch, because those blades to cut him up a bit, although he tastes the blood and goes on.  Lee died six days before the movie was released in Hong Kong.  He was about to meet with George Lazenby about a film.  Some medication he took led to his death, apparently, and his brain had swollen quite a bit.  November 27 would have been his 77th birthday.  The movie showed him as practically invulnerable, yet a back injury had affected him.  I read a little bit of Lee eating hash brownies and had to wonder how if affected him.  After all the martial arts fighting we’ve seen over the decades, it’s still fun to go back to 1973.  I wonder what kind of career Lee would have had.  I look at how Jackie Chan is still around.  I don’t see Lee with a sense of humor and showing up in something like The LEGO Ninjago Movie, however.  The “Enter the Dragon” disc had extra features, although I wasn’t driven to sit through the story of the making of the film.  Director Robert Clouse had done “Darker Than Amber” with Rod Taylor, and he would go on to work on “Black Belt Jones” with Jim Kelly and “The Big Brawl” with Jackie Chan.  He also worked on the infamous “Gymkata” in 1985, recognized as one of the worst movies of all time.  Clouse died in 1997 at age 68.  Some of the people who died on October 11 include Chico Marx (1961), Jean Cocteau (1963), Redd Foxx (1991), Cory Lidle (2006), and Gil Stratton (2008).  Today is a birthday for Luke Perry (51), Joan Cusack (55), Steve Young (56), and Daryl Hall (71).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 11, “The Bugs Bunny Show” debuted on ABC primetime in 1960.  In 1975, Neil Sedaka had the Number one single, “Bad Blood.”  Also in 1975, “Saturday Night Live” made its debut with Geroge Carlin.  In 1986, Dana Carvey’s Church Lady made her first Saturday Night Live appearance.  In 1991, Redd Foxx died at age 68 after suffering a heart attack while working on “The Royal Family.”

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Loving Vincent

I awoke to the smell of smoke the and news of wildfires burning down many homes.  I sat in the plaza for a while before I told the bus out to Emeryville to see “Blade Runner 2049” again.  One woman brought her young daughter, who could stop talking.  One other person kept talking to the screen.  Late in the movie, someone had fallen asleep and snored.  I guess that was a comment on how many people felt about the movie, that it was too long.  I liked the movie a bit more than I did the first time, although having a lot of characters who didn’t display a lot of emotion didn’t make the movie very exciting.  I headed home while listening to the radio.  I heard a lot of comments about the Raiders and Jack Del Rio.  I stopped to buy a beef burrito, and then I walked over to another theatre to see “Loving Vincent.”  It was an animated film that was about the life and death of Vincent Van Gogh with images in the style of Van Gogh.  It was something of an investigation of his death, and had something of the feeling of a JFK search for the truth.  I thought the film was a good change of pace from the computerized animation of the past couple of decades.  It was something like an art lesson, somewhat in the vein of Terry Gilliam’s “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen.”  There is a lot of going back in time, for which the film goes to black and white.  The death of Van Gogh does seem mysterious, since he supposedly shot himself in the stomach.  The film caused many people in the audience to whisper to each other about the paintings that were being referenced.  Saoirse Ronan was one of the voices in the film, as Marguerite.  I thought the script could have used some more work, but I enjoyed the movie on the whole.  I appreciated how something different was attempted.  This is supposed to be the first fully painted feature film, and more than 100 artists worked on it.  It’s one of the most visually striking films I have ever seen.  I wished the story had gone more into Vincent’s character, and why he turned out to be what he was.  We briefly see him experience failure and not being able to hold lowly jobs, as his father disapproves of him.  It is hard to explore what really goes on in a person’s mind.  The directors were Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman.  I don’t know where they will go from here, since “Loving Vincent” was a project that took years.  I think that this film will last for a long time in people’s minds.  It could have been more substantial, but it gives viewers something they want.  I felt glad that I had seen it.  I tried to remember movies like “Lust for Life” and “Vincent and Theo,” but it’s been a long time.  The Robert Altman film was released in 1990.  What was I doing that year besides wasting my time?  I felt a bit dismayed at how quickly the holiday weekend ended.  I felt a little better after finishing up the writing of some lecture notes.  I watched the news about the people who lost their houses in the wildfire.  It was also disturbing to hear the news about Harvey Weinstein.  It shows that none of us outsiders knows anything about people involved in making movies.  Ashley Judd certainly had a story to tell.  I wonder how much Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, Kate Winslet, Judi Dench, Jennifer Lawrence, and George Clooney knew about this behavior.  I saw a little bit of Ed Sullivan highlights, and Tony Bennett was singing, but I missed The Carpenters.  I watched the first episode of the third season of Supergirl.  It didn’t excite me.  The Brandon Brooks radio segment reminded me that it was John Lennon’s birthday, but I didn’t bring out the albums to listen to them.  I heard that the Yankees stayed alive with their win against Cleveland.  I think I’d rather see the Yankees play the Astros in the next round.  Some of the people who died on October 10 include Ralph Richardson (1983), Yul Brynner (1985), Orson Welles (1985), Teresa Graves (2002), Christopher Reeve (2004), Solomon Burke (2010), Alex Karras (2012), and Scott Carpenter (2013).  Today is a birthday for Brett Favre (48) and David Lee Roth (62).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 10, the Supreme made their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965.  In 1977, Steve Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith were injured in Philadelphia when a fan threw an M-80 onto the stage.  In 1979, the Bette Midler film “The Rose” had its premiere in Los Angeles.  In 1980, “Private Benjamin,” starring Goldie Hawn, was released.

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Baltimore Ravens 30, Oakland Raiders 17

My parents phoned me later than usual because of the lateness of the sunrise.  I went out to the plaza to use my computer, and then I headed out to take the bus to the Fruitvale BART station.  I listened to Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me on the radio.  I looked through the team store to look for a new cap and took a look at the game day pin.  I took a seat and watched highlights on the scoreboard.  I fell asleep for a few minutes, but no one seemed to notice.  I listened to the 49ers game with the Colts on the radio.  Most of the players stood for the national anthem.  Two fans in front of me kept eating their tots and hot dogs, though.  We were reminded that the death of Al Davis had occurred six years ago, and the person lighting the torch was Andre Ward.  We would hear some Tom Petty music throughout the game, such as “I Won’t Back Down” and “The Waiting.”  The Raiders won the coin toss and deferred, so the Ravens received the opening kickoff.  On the next play, the Ravens threw a long pass.  They scored a touchdown with a 2-yard run only 2:15 into the game.  When the Raiders got the ball for the first time, a pass play ended with a fumble with a return of 47 yards for another touchdown for the Ravens.  At least some of us had the suspicion the game had been decided at that moment, considering the team’s losing ways of the past two weeks.  Before the first quarter was done, the Raiders managed a field goal, making the score 14-3.  In the second quarter, the Ravens pushed their advantage with another touchdown, putting them ahead 21-3.  Before the game, we kept hearing that they had been having trouble scoring points recently.  Sean Smith was the target of many of the fans’ disgust.  EJ Manuel was playing quarterback in place of Derek Carr, and he did make some plays, like a touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree that went 41 yards.  Fans near me kept yelling for Manuel to pass to Crabtree.  Before the half ended, the Ravens kicked a field goal to go ahead 24-10.  The fan who went through the trivia challenge missed the questions about Jack Del Rio and Grady Jackson.  His failure seemed symbolic of the day.  The halftime show was a group of BMX bikers, who saved their best for last, as they did their flips.  One of the guys stumbled a bit, but there were no disasters.  The Ravens had been giving up a lot of rushing yards, but the Raiders had been behind by 14 points four minutes into the game.  The Raiders did get the only score of the third quarter, and two big plays were running plays, as Manuel got close to the end zone with a run, and he handed the ball to Marshawn Lynch for a three-yard run for a touchdown.  That was the high point of the afternoon, as it gave the possibility of a comeback, and the crowd was finally loud and enthusiastic.  The score was 24-17 going into the fourth quarter.  Unfortunately for the home team, the Ravens controlled the ball for most of the remainder of the game, taking a whole lot of time off the clock.  They kicked a field goal two minutes into the quarter to make the score 27-17.  The Raiders had fourth down and four with eight minutes left, and the fans were angry that Del Rio decided to punt.  The defense hadn’t stopped the Ravens, and they couldn’t stop them at this crucial part of the game, as the Ravens held the ball until 2:24 was left, and they kicked a field goal for the 30-17 score.  After a promising 2-0 start, the Raiders had lost their third consecutive game.  Was this the team that was supposed to be a Super Bowl contender?  The game in Washington appeared to expose quite a few weaknesses.  On my way home, I felt sad at the way this holiday weekend was coming to an end.  I listened to Chris Townsend on the radio.  He was critical of Marshawn Lynch’s dancing at the end of the Jets game a few weeks ago, as it showed an overconfidence when the team really hadn’t accomplished anything at that point.  He also noted, like everyone else, that Amari Cooper had caught only one pass for eight yards during the entire game.  Cooper is supposed to be a star player, but he’s been absent all season.  The Chiefs were ready to win again and go to a 5-0 record.  The Raiders were already lowering their sights to a wild card spot, which might not even happen.  I wondered if I would have had a better time if I had gone over to the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival to see Cheap Trick and Lucinda Williams.  I listened to Robert Hilburn’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Times radio program on KCSN.  He played songs by Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, and Randy Newman.  I was too sleepy to see a movie.  Listening to the news, Eric Reid misused the word “confuse” in his comments about Pence.  These football players don’t learn a lot of things in college.  Some of the people who died on October 9 include Che Guevara (1967), Oskar Schindler (1974), Herbert Ross (2001), and Louis Nye (2005).  Today is a birthday for Sean Lennon (42), PJ Harvey (48), Guillermo del Toro (53), John O’Hurley (64), Sharon Osbourne (65) and Jackson Browne (69).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for October 9, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” starring James Cagney and Mickey Rooney, was released in 1935.  In 1973, Elvis and Priscilla Presley were divorced after six years of marriage.  In 1986, “The Late Show with Joan Rivers” made its debut.

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