Sonny Gray’s Rocky First Inning

I walked from the theatre over to the bus stop for the 1 bus, which I took to go out towards the Coliseum.  I talked with one rider who asked me about the Rickey Henderson jersey giveaway coming up on July 15.  I sat down under the shade of a tree and listened to the news.  I heard that Daniel Day-Lewis was retiring from the movies.  I thought back to his appearance in “Sunday Bloody Sunday.”  The gates opened early so that we could see batting practice.  A bonus for us on this day was that the prospect Austin Beck was out there taking swings, and he looked quite good.  After batting practice ended, I headed to the food trucks and bought a teriyaki chicken plate, which was actually in a container, and a cookies and cream ice.  A breeze was making the hot temperature tolerable, and the night would actually get cool before it was over.  I watched a woman near me singing along to “Proud Mary.”  Before the A’s took the field, we heard Steve Miller’s “Rock ‘N Me.”  Sonny Gray had what Ken Korach on the radio called a rocky first inning against the Astros.  He went to a 3-1 to the game’s first batter before giving up a home run.  A walk and a single put him into more trouble before he got a double play ground ball.  He went to a 2-2 count to the next hitter, but then gave up a double for another run.  Gray then allowed a discouraging walk on four pitches, went to 0-2 on the next batter, and then gave up a double for a third run.  The eighth hatter in the inning came up, and Gray surrendered a single for two more runs.  After a stolen base, an error by Ryon Healy prolonged the torture of the inning.  The tenth batter of the inning was finally the last, with a ground ball going to Healy.  Sonny Gray had thrown 38 pitches in the inning, and his ERA had increased from 4.44 to 5.20.  The A’s managed to answer the Houston runs with what Korach called a mini-statement.  With two outs, Jed Lowrie singled and Khris Davis doubled for one run.  Gray pulled himself together and managed to get through four scoreless innings, although none of them was a clean inning.  He gave up a walk with two outs in the second, hit a batter with a pitch with two outs in the third, allowed a single with one out in the fourth, and allowed a single and a walk in fifth.  He lowered his ERA from 5.20 to 4.84 over that stretch.  We heard “Born to Be Wild” before the A’s came to bat in the third inning.  On the radio, Eric Kubota talked about Austin Beck.  We heard Bob Melvin talk about this nervousness in working out in front of the Baltimore Orioles at the Coliseum years ago.  The A’s got a bit closer to the Astros with a Chad Pinder home run.  The A’s were chipping away, in Korach’s words.  In the fourth inning, Khris Davis singled and Yonder Alonso doubled for a promising start.  Ryon Healy hit the ball well, but the line drive went for an out, although it drove in another run, making the score 5-3.  Stephen Vogt drew a walk on four pitches, but Rajai Davis hit into a 4-6-3 double play.  In the fifth inning, Jaycob Brugman walked with one out and reached second base on a passed ball, but then Chad Pinder and Jed Lowrie both struck out.  John Axford pitched the top of the sixth inning and allowed only a double with one out.  In the bottom of the inning, Khris Davis doubled.  He went to third base on a ground ball out to first.  With a good chance to drive in a run, Healy struck out.  The low, sinking outside pitch is a weakness for him.  Josh Phegley pinch-hit for Vogt and hit the ball to left field for the third out.  Daniel Coulombe pitched the top of the seventh inning, and he had a clean inning, lowering his ERA from 1.93 to 1.85.  Korach praised the job that he was doing this season.  In the bottom of the ending, Rajai Davis doubled.  Adam Rosales annoyingly made an out that didn’t advance the runner.  Brugman singled to bring the A’s to within one run at 5-4.  Pinder and Lowrie made outs.  Liam Hendriks pitched the top of the eighth inning and got off to a bad start by giving up a double and a walk.  A fly ball to center and a strikeout got him close to escaping the inning, but then he allowed a walk to load the bases and gave up a first-pitch single that suddenly made the score 7-4.  Ray Fosse called the hit a dagger.  A line drive to right field was the third out, too late.  In the bottom of the inning, Khris Davis, Yonder Alonso, and Ryon Healy all struck out against the former A’s pitcher Luke Gregerson.  Michael Brady made his debut for the A’s in taking the mound for the top of the ninth inning.  Unfortunately, the first batter he faced hit a home run, making the score 8-4.  Brady’s ERA went from infinity to 27.00 with a call that Rosales caught.  It went down to 13.50 with a foul ball that Alonso caught.  It remained at 13.50 when Brady hit the next batter with a pitch.  It went down to 9.00 when Phegley threw out the runner trying to steal second base.  In the bottom of the ninth inning, Phegley doubled.  Rajai Davis hit the ball hard to the left side for what looked for a moment like a double, but it was a line drive out.  Adam Rosales struck out.  He was 0-for-4 on the night.  Brugman had the count at 3-2 when he struck out, but it was a wild pitch that allowed him to reach first base.  Pinder also got to a 3-2 count, and like Rajai Davis, he hit the ball hard, but it was also a line drive out, and this one ended the game.  The Houston Astros again demonstrated their superiority.  The game started at 7:07 with a game time temperature of 66 degrees, and it ended at 10:35.  The attendance was 15,362.  I was tired and wanted to go home.  I didn’t especially want to hear news about special election results.  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 21, the Rolling Stones were banned from New York hotels in 1966.  In 1969, Pete Townsend was detained in Memphis for using the slang term “bomb.”  In 1977, the Martin Scorsese film “New York, New York” was released.  In 1991, “Dying Young,” starring Julia Roberts, was released.  In 2001 Carroll O’Connor died of a heart attack at age 76.

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Cars 3

I used my computer early in the morning to order some items, like the Blu-ray Criterion Collection edition of “Being There” and a Partridge Family cookbook.  I shopped for groceries and then caught the bus headed towards Jack London Square so that I could see an early afternoon showing of “Cars 3.”  I had good memories of the original movie because Paul Newman was the voice of one of the characters, and even my mother, who hates animation, said that she thought it was a good movie.  I thought that “Cars 3” was not a good movie, rather boring at times.  It seemed that the filmmakers were trying to go the way of Toy Story in giving the animated characters human emotions and problems.  The kids going to see this movie don’t want to see a Lightning McQueen who is like their parents.  The story was about aging and dealing with it, and the erosion of the talent you’ve counted on all your life.  I had a suspicion that the themes reflected the people making the film.  What was good about this sequel was that Mater was not the center of the action, as in “Cars 2.”  What was not so good was the long scenes with Owen Wilson talking.  The telling sign of how the audience was perceiving this movie was the restlessness of the little kids in the audience.  They seemed bored for long stretches.  Did we need to see scenes of Lightning McQueen feeling uncertain and trying to decide what to do?  His dilemma was that he couldn’t reach the speed of his rival.  He seemed like a middle-aged man dealing with impotence.  The idea that a car needs to go into training was questionable, but then we have to go to a new location for more training that had shades of “The Black Stallion.”  The use of Bruce Springsteen’s “Glory Days” on the soundtrack was predictable, as there was a generally stale quality to the film.  One thing I had to think about was that if there are male cars and female cars, then how exactly do they reproduce?  I don’t recall a love scene in any of the Cars movies.  The ending wasn’t one of your simple, happy endings, but it also wasn’t too satisfying.  Pixar has certainly done too many sequels in recent years.  They need more people with original ideas.  They need fresher stories.  I stayed until the very end of the credits, and there was a brief scene with Mater, but I’m not sure that it’s worth staying in the theatre just to see that little bit.  The movie did make me want to know a little bit more about Cristela Alonzo.  I missed her television show entirely.  She was born in 1979.  I see that Owen Wilson will turn 49 this year.  Some of the people who died on June 21 include June Christy (1990), John Lee Hooker (2001), Carroll O’Connor (2001), and Leon Uris (2003).  Today is a birthday for Chris Pratt (38), Juliette Lewis (44), Meredith Baxter (70), Michael Gross (70), and Ray Davies (73).

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Daniel Gossett’s Improvement

I went to work, and there was confusion about the schedule.  I was glad to get away.  I watched Match Game on television, and then went over to the BART station to head out to the Coliseum.  After the gates opened, I headed for the food trucks and bought steak tacos and an Italian ice.  I took my seat.  I heard on the news that the A’s had interest in a site near Laney College for their new stadium.  As game time approached, it looked as if Falcon McFalconface was sleeping on the job, because there were plenty of sea gulls in the stadium.  One of the Warriors, JaVale McGee, threw out the first pitch.  Watching him warm up, I saw that he had a short throwing motion.  It seemed that he was there to promote a celebrity softball game.  The starting pitcher for the A’s was someone I had never seen before, Daniel Gossett.  He gave up a single on the second pitch of the game.  The play had been reversed because initially it seemed the Khris Davis had the ball in his glove long enough to count as an out.  Gossett got four consecutive outs.  In the second inning, he allowed a double with two outs, and then he got eight consecutive outs, which made for two clean innings in the third and fourth.  Gossett allowed a double to start the fifth inning, and then he got two ground ball outs.  He had entered the game with an ERA of 16.20, and at this point, it was down to 6.75.  Unfortunately, it would go up again on the 2-2 pitch to the next batter, which was hit out of the park for a two-run home run.  Gossett got a strikeout to end the inning.  He allowed a single to start the sixth inning, but then got the next three batters out on two line drives and a strikeout.  For the first five innings, the only offense from the A’s was a single by Yonder Alonso with one out in the second inning, and a single by Adam Rosales with one out in the third inning.  In the bottom of the sixth inning, Matt Joyce doubled and Chad Pinder drew a walk. Jed Lowrie doubled, scoring Joyce, but Pinder was thrown out on a 9-6-2 play.  The Astros were showing why they had the best record in the major leagues.  Khris Davis drew a walk, but after a pitching change, Yonder Alonso grounded out.  The failure of the A’s to tie the score felt like a turning point in the game.  Gossett pitched into the top of the seventh inning.  He got the first two batters out, and then allowed a double, which prompted Bob Melvin to bring in Liam Hendriks, who annoyingly walked the next batter.  However, he then picked the runner off second base to end the inning.  Daniel Gossett’s ERA at the end of the night was 7.20.  John Axford, who has not been my favorite A’s pitcher this season, allowed a home run, making the score 3-1.  He got two ground ball outs, and then allowed a walk.  Another ground ball ended the inning.  Josh Smith pitched the top of the ninth inning.  After a ground ball out, he allowed another big home run, making the score 4-1.  A double threatened to make things worse, but then Smith got a strikeout and a ground ball to shortstop for the last two outs.  After the Khris Davis walk following Lowrie’s run-scoring double in the sixth inning, the A’s managed only a walk from the pinch-hitting Stephen Vogt in the seventh inning.  They were down to their last three outs.  Khris Davis grounded out.  Yonder Alonso hit a ball to left field that was caught.  Ryon Healy was the last hope.  He was 0-for-3 and looked bad in swinging at some low pitches.  The count on him went to 1-2, and then he hit a foul ball that the Astros right fielder caught in foul ground for the last out of the game.  The game had started at 7:07 with a game time temperature of 72 degrees, and it ended at 10:03.  The attendance was 10,482.  The Astros’ road record was an impressive 24-8.  Some of the people who died on June 20 include Bugsy Siegel (1947), Estelle Winwood (1984), LeRoy Neiman (2012), and Andrew Sarris (2012).  Today is a birthday for Nicole Kidman (50), John Goodman (65), Lionel Richie (68), Candy Clark (70), Anne Murray (72), Brian Wilson (75), Danny Aiello (84), and Martin Landau (89).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 20, “The Naughty Nineties,” featuring Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on First” routine, was released in 1945.  In 1975, “Jaws” was released.  In 1987, Johnny Carson married his fourth wife, Alexis Maas.

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Khris Davis’ Two-Run Home Run

I watched the end of a Gomer Pyle episode, and then I watched CBS Sunday Morning.  I looked at this week’s Best Buy ad and thought about buying a DVD box set of The Addams Family.  I took the bus out to the Fruitvale BART station.  I got to the Coliseum just before eleven o’clock.  It was going to be a hot afternoon.  The giveaway was a Marcus Semien Starting Lineup action figure.  It brought back a memory of a former player named Troy Neel.  I went over to the food trucks and bought a chicken bowl.  I bought a blue raspberry Italian ice and headed for my seat.  The temperature would get so hot that I thought about leaving my seat for some cover, or even leave the stadium entirely.  The big man in front of me was a heavy Yankees fan who smelled sweaty and horrible.  Thankfully, he would leave his seat before the game was over.  Jharel Cotton was the starting pitcher for the A’s.  He pitched a clean first inning, but then he gave up a home run to start the second inning.  He allowed a single and a walk before getting out of the inning.  In the third inning, a double and a single gave the Yankees their second run.  In the bottom of the inning, Jaycob Brugman struck out, but then Josh Phegley singled, and Matt Joyce doubled.  Chad Pinder followed with a double to tie the score.  Jed Lowrie grounded out, moving Pinder to third base, and then Khris Davis hit a home run on a 2-1 pitch to put the A’s ahead, 4-2.  Ryon Healy struck out to end the inning.  Cotton was unable to shut down the Yankees in the fourth inning, as he allowed a home run over the right field foul pole. The umpires reviewed the play and confirmed the call.  Cotton hit the next batter with a pitch, but then got two strikeouts.  The runner at first base was caught stealing.  Cotton allowed a single to start the fifth inning, but then he got seven consecutive outs as a finish to his afternoon.  We saw Rollie Fingers missing from the Big Head race.  Since it was Father’s Day, Stanley and Stomper formed a tag team.  Stomper had some energy, but it was Dennis Eckersley who won this race.  I suspected that Rollie Fingers was Stanley for the day.  Daniel Coulombe took over for Cotton and went to a 3-2 count before getting a strikeout, and he got a ground ball for the third out.  During the seventh inning stretch, we heard James Brown’s “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag.”  Since the Davis home run, only three A’s had reached base.  Brugman had singled in the fourth inning before getting caught stealing.  Joyce had singled in the fifth inning, and Khris Davis had doubled in the sixth inning.  In the bottom of the seventh, Matt Joyce drew a walk on a 3-2 pitch with two outs, but that was it.  Ryan Madson pitched the top of the eighth inning.  A ground ball was the first out, but then he hit Aaron Judge with a pitch.  Madson went to a 3-2 count on the next batter before getting a key 4-6-3 double play.  Aroldis Chapman came out to pitch a clean inning in the bottom of the eighth.  Sean Doolittle went out to pitch the top of the ninth for a second consecutive day.  His second pitched was popped up for an out.  Unfortunately, Pinder made a two-base throwing error.  Ken Korach on the radio suggested that Pinder had too much time during the play.  Doolittle struck out the next batter on a 2-2 pitch.  The next pitch was popped up, and Yonder Alonso caught it to end the game.  It was a 4-3 win, and the first time the A’s had swept a four-game series against the Yankees since 2012.  It had happened before, in 1972.  The game had started at 1:07 with a game time temperature of 90 degrees, and it ended at 4:02.  It was the highest game time temperature since June 20, 2008, when it was 91 degrees.  The highest ever was 92 degrees.  The attendance was 34,140.  Korach told us about the existence of Falcon McFalconface, who was supposed to keep the sea gulls away from us.  Korach also mentioned the famous Jason Giambi home run that ended the game on August 12, 2001, giving the A’s eleven consecutive wins at the time.  I hurried out of the stadium because I wanted to get home and drink a lot of water.  I listened to Robert Hilburn’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Times program on KCSN.  The songs were by X and Los Lobos.  The Columbo episode on Me TV involved a person who claimed to be a psychic, and a magician’s guillotine.  The episode of The Night Stalker, which was about a vampire.  Jan Murray was a guest on the show.  I wouldn’t say that he was a great dramatic actor.  This was Paul McCartney’s 75th birthday.  I didn’t have too much time for music after ten o’clock, however.  Some of the people who died on June 19 include Ethel Rosenberg (1953), Julius Rosenberg (1953), Ed Wynn (1966), Jean Arthur (1991), William Golding (1993), Manute Bol (2010), James Gandolfini (2013), and Gerry Goffin (2014).  Today is a birthday for Zoe Saldana (39), Paula Abdul (55), Kathleen Turner (63), Ann Wilson (67), Phylicia Rashad (69), and Gena Rowlands (87).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 19, Carole King had her first Number One single, the double-sided hit “It’s Too Late” and “I Feel the Earth Move,” in 1971.  In 1987, the comedy “Roxanne,” starring Steve Martin and Daryl Hannah, was released.  In 2013, James Gandolfini died of a heart attack at age 51 in Rome.

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Ryon Healy’s Two Home Runs

I awoke early and headed to the BART station.  I arrived at the Coliseum too early, and so I sat at the Amtrak station for a while.  I went over to the C Gate, which was being renamed the Catfish Hunter Gate this morning in a ceremony.  Joe Rudi, Vida Blue, Bert Campaneris, Blue Moon Odom, and Rickey Henderson were present.  One of the staff handed me a Catfish Hunter pin.  I walked all the way around the stadium to get to the season ticket holder line.  After the gates opened, I went to a food truck to buy tacos.  Walking through the plaza, I saw three A’s employees carrying three World Series trophies.  I bought a Creamsicle shake and headed for my seat.  It would turn out to be a hot afternoon.  Before the ceremonial first pitch, Reggie Jackson joined his 1970s A’s teammates on the field.  To my eyes, it seemed that Reggie had shrunk since I last saw him as a player on the field in 1987.  Jesse Hahn, the starting pitcher for the A’s, got into a bit of trouble in the first inning when he walked two batters with one out, but then he got a strikeout and a ground out.  In the bottom of the inning, Matt Joyce swung at the first pitch for a home run.  Hahn was unable to provide the shutdown inning, however.  In the second inning with one out, three hits and a sacrifice fly gave the Yankees two runs.  In the bottom of the inning with one out, Ryon Healy hit a home run to tie the score at 2-2.  Matt Chapman followed with a double and one out later Josh Phegley reached base on a wild pitch on a strikeout.  Joyce walked to load the bases, but Adam Rosales struck out.  Hahn did produce the shutdown inning with a clean third inning, and he also had a good fourth inning but for a two-base throwing error by Rosales.  The bottom of the fourth inning was a good one for the A’s.  Healy hit a second home run to make the score 3-2.  Jaycob Brugman and Josh Phegley both struck out, but then Matt Joyce, Adam Rosales, and Jed Lowrie hit consecutive singles to push the score to 5-2.  Hahn walked the first batter in the fifth inning, but he got the next three batters out.  He threw more than 100 pitches in getting through five innings.  The Yankees went to the relief pitching after only four innings.  Liam Hendriks pitched the top of the sixth inning and had a clean and quick inning with two strikeouts and a ground ball.  The A’s loaded the bases in the bottom of the innings as Brugman singled, Joyce walked with one out, and Lowrie walked with two outs.  However, Khris Davis struck out for the third time in the game.  In the third inning, he had a bad moment when he hit a high pop that looked like a sure out in foul ground, but the third baseman couldn’t catch it.  The catcher picked up the ball that threw to first base for the out as Davis was standing around home plate.  The fans didn’t like seeing that.  The Big Head race turned out the same way it has been of late, with Rollie Fingers grabbing Dennis Eckersley, allowing Rickey Henderson to win.  Josh Smith pitched the top of the seventh inning.  He had a 6.88 ERA, but he did well and had a clean inning.  The A’s loaded the bases again in the bottom of the inning.  Yonder Alonso and Ryon Healy both singled, and after Chapman struck out, Brugman walked.  However, Josh Phegley hit into a double play.  He went 0-for-4 for the day.  Ryan Madson pitched the top of the eighth inning and gave up only a two-out single.  The A’s got only a double from Matt Joyce in the bottom of the inning.  He had three hits and two walks for the game, missing the cycle by a triple.  Sean Doolittle came out to pitch the top of the ninth inning.  He struck out the first batter, but gave up a single to the second.  He struck out the next two to end the game, as he saved the 5-2 win.  The relief pitchers did a great job with four scoreless innings.  Jesse Hahn got the win.  While Joyce had a great game, Khris Davis struck out four times and had that embarrassing moment.  The game had started at 1:07 with a game time temperature of 81 degrees, and it ended at 4:24.  The attendance was 31,418.  It was three consecutive wins over the Yankees.  I was anxious to get back home and drink a lot of water.  I stopped by Trader Joe’s to buy some lemonade.  I watched the Pirates and Cubs on television, and then I saw the Partridge Family episode “Queen for a Minute.”  I thought that one flaw was that Frankie didn’t look like a good basketball player.  Another was Laurie’s speech, which didn’t make it clear what she was doing.  I watched the Star Trek episode with Christopher Pike and Talos IV.  They were going to show part two next Saturday.  Some of the people who died on June 18 include Ethel Barrymore (1959), Eddie Gaedel (1961), John Cheever (1982), Curd Jürgens (1982), Alan Berg (1984), Peter Allen (1992), Nancy Merchand (2000), Jack Buck (2002), Clarence Clemons (2011), and Victor Spinetti (2012).  Today is a birthday for Carol Kane (65), Isabella Rossellini (65), and Paul McCartney (75).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 18, the “Gunsmoke” radio program aired for the last time in 1961.  In 1969, “The Wild Bunch,” starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine, was released.  In 1971, “Willard,” starring Bruce Davison, Elsa Lanchester, Ernest Borgnine, and Sondra Locke, was released.  In 1993, the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie “Last Action Hero” was released.

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Matt Chapman’s First Major League Hit

I went out to work and stayed inside an air-conditioned room for a while.  I went home for a salad, and then I went out to take BART to the Coliseum.  The gates were opening earlier than usual because it was a fireworks night.  I went over to the food trucks and bought only the orange mango Italian ice.  I took my seat and fell asleep for a while.  One Yankees fan sitting near me was wearing a wig and a judge’s robe with the number 99 on the back.  Sean Manaea, the A’s starting pitcher started off well, pitching a clean first inning, and giving up just a single in the second inning.  The bottom of that second inning was productive for the A’s.  Khris Davis and Yonder Alonso both walked, but Ryon Healy struck out.  Stephen Vogt doubled to give the A’s the first run of the game.  Matt Chapman grounded out but drove in the second run.  Jaycob Brugman, Matt Joyce and Jed Lowrie all singled.  At the ending of the inning, the A’s had scored four runs.  Unfortunately, Manaea couldn’t produce the shutdown inning.  In the third inning with one out, he allowed a single.  After a 3-6 out, he gave up a single and a home run, so now the Yankees were within 4-3.  A fly ball out to right field was the third out, and Manaea struck out the next four batters, but then allowed a double and a single to tie the game at 4-4.  He allowed two walks to load the bases before he got out of the inning.  We saw a pie-eating contest in which one person tried to eat neatly.  In the sixth inning, Manaea gave up a home run, giving the Yankees a 5-4 lead.  After a single, Manaea got three consecutive outs with the help of Matt Chapman with a good play.  In the Big Head race, Rickey Henderson won again.  Josh Smith took over for Manaea, and in between the two outs that he got, he allowed a triple, a walk, and a single that made the score 6-4.  Daniel Coulombe got a strikeout to end the inning.  During the seventh inning stretch, we heard Run-DMC’s “Walk This Way.”  In the bottom of the inning, Chapman struck out, but Rajai Davis, pinch-hitting for Brugman, walked.  Matt Joyce singled, advancing Davis to third.  Chad Pinder hit a fly ball to center, bringing in the run to make the score 6-5.  Joyce went to second base on a wild pitch, but Jed Lowrie lined out to end the inning.  Coulombe pitched a clean eighth inning.  At 9:17, the stadium lights had taken full effect, according to Ken Korach on the radio, and at 9:18, the crowd started The Wave.  In the bottom of the eighth inning, Khris Davis popped out to the second baseman.  Yonder Alonso walked on four pitches.  Ryon Healy doubled.  Stephen Vogt was intentionally walked, bringing up the rookie Matt Chapman.  The count went to 0-2 on him, but he came through with a single down the left field line, bringing in Alonso and Healy for a 7-6 lead.  Rajai Davis hit into a double play, so the A’s had to settle for a one-run lead for Santiago Casilla to save.  Casilla went to a 1-2 count on the first batter of the ninth inning in getting a strikeout.  He went to a 3-2 count before surrendering a walk.  He went to a 2-2 count before getting a strikeout.  Casilla again went to a 2-2, and this time he got the strikeout to end the game.  The crowd was happy about the 7-6 win, and they were ready to see their fireworks show.  The game had started at 6:37 with a game time temperature of 77 degrees, and it ended at 9:50.  The attendance was 30,184.  There was a good number of fans who bought tickets for the third deck.  I headed to field to see the fireworks as I listened to the postgame radio show.  I sat on the grass in front of the A’s dugout.  The theme was karaoke songs, like “Love Shack,” “Livin’ on a Prayer,” and “Don’t Stop Believin’.”  After it was all over, I headed to the BART station and got on a train at 11 o’clock, and I got home just after midnight.  I saw Loni Anderson on Match Game before I went to sleep. Some of the people who died on June 17 include Jeff Chandler (1961), Kate Smith (1986), John Matuszak (1989), and Cyd Charisse (2008).  Today is a birthday for Kendrick Lamar (30), Thomas Haden Church (57), Jello Biafra (59), and Barry Manilow (74).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 17, “The Terror,” starring Boris Karloff and Jack Nicholson, was released in 1963.  In 1977, “Exorcist II: The Heretic,” featuring Linda Blair, Louise Fletcher, Richard Burton, Max von Sydow, Kitty Winn, Paul Henreid, James Earl Jones, and Ned Beatty, was released.  In 1994, “Wolf,” starring Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, and James Spader, was released.

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Khris Davis’ Two-Out Two-Run Tenth Inning Walk-Off Single

I awoke and set out for the Warriors victory parade pretty early, but there were already many people lined up along the streets.  I managed to find a spot behind a camera setup that gave me a clear view.  A reporter from the local NBC took shots of the crowd, so perhaps I ended up on television.  I did get good looks at Draymond Green and Stephen Curry.  I saw Steve Kerr not in a car, but walking down the street.  I took a walk along with the rest of the crowd towards the rally.  Walking through Laney College, I caught a glimpse of Barry Bonds going in the opposite direction.  The traffic of people got a bit frightening as they pushed along, but in the end I found myself in a decent location underneath a tree with a decent view after a few people left following Steve Kerr’s comments.  A couple of people talked for far too long, as we were out there under the hot sun.  I was satisfied, as I did well with this experience, considering that there were a million other people there.  I walked towards the 12th Street BART station, stopping to buy a hat at the team store tent.  I couldn’t take my normal bus towards the Fruitvale BART station, so I took the train to the Coliseum.  I was too early, but I rested at a bench.  The giveaway was a scarf.  I stood in line behind an obnoxious Yankees fan who claimed that he was not an obnoxious Yankees fan.  On the radio, I heard the news that pitching coach Curt Young had been fired, and Trevor Plouffe was off the team in favor of Matt Chapman.  After the gates opened, I headed to the food trucks and had a California burrito with a watermelon drink.  I headed to my seat feeling better after the food.  The starting pitcher for the A’s was Sonny Gray.  He gave up a double to the first batter of the game, and a single with one out and a walk with two outs loaded the bases, but he escaped that jam.  In the bottom of the inning, Jed Lowrie hit a home run with two outs, giving the A’s a 1-0 lead.  In the second inning, Gray allowed a single, but a double play and a fly ball to right field gave him the shutdown inning.  In the bottom of the inning with two outs, Matt Chapman drew a walk in his first major league at-bat.  Josh Phegley doubled, and Adam Rosales drove in two runs with another double.  Gray had a clean third inning for a second shutdown inning.  In the bottom of the inning, Lowrie tripled with one out, but Khris Davis struck out, and Yonder Alonso grounded out.  In the fourth inning, Gray allowed a single, a wild pitch, and a walk, but no runs.  He had a clean fifth inning, but ran into trouble with one out in the sixth inning.  After a single, a walk, and three singles, the score was tied at 3-3, and Gray was out of the game.  Sean Doolittle came in and got a strikeout and ground ball to keep the score tied.  In the bottom of the inning, Yonder Alonso hit a home run that Ken Korach on the radio described as a rainmaker, giving the A’s a 4-3 lead.  Korach told us that Plouffe was gracious in accepting the news of his departure, shaking hands with everyone on the plane from Miami.  We saw a Big Head race, and again, Rollie Fingers pushed Dennis Eckersley so that Rickey Henderson had an easy victory.  Kara Tsuboi was on maternity leave, and so she was not around for the bits between innings.  Ruby Lopez didn’t take her place.  Doolittle got a strikeout to start the seventh inning, but Ryan Madson then took over.  During the rest of the night, the relief pitchers seemed unable to get a strike on the first pitch.  Madson got the second out on one pitch, but then gave up a single and a double, making the score 4-4.  During the seventh inning stretch, we heard “Shake It Off.”  In the bottom of the inning, Matt Joyce pinch-hit for Rosales and singled.  After Rajai Davis put down a sacrifice bunt, Chad Pinder singled to give the A’s the lead again at 5-4.  John Axford pitched the top of the eighth inning, and after a strikeout, he gave up a home run, tying the score again at 5-5.  After giving up a single to the next batter, Daniel Coulombe came in and got two outs.  In the bottom of the inning, Alonso singled.  After Ryon Healy struck out, Matt Chapman walked.  Stephen Vogt pinch-hit for Phegley and walked to load the bases.  Joyce hit a ground ball to second base, and trying to avoid a double play, he dived to first base.  Alonso did score the run to give the A’s yet another one-run lead at 6-5.  Santiago Casilla had the chance to save the game in the ninth inning.  He went to a 3-2 count to the first batter before getting a strikeout.  He went to a 2-0 count to the next batter and gave up a double, and a single again tied the score, this time at 6-6.  After a stolen base and a fly ball out, Casilla gave one of those two-pitch intentional walks before finally getting a strikeout to end the inning.  In the bottom of the inning, Lowrie singled with one out, and then Khris Davis walked.  Alonso had the chance to be the hero, but he struck out.  We were informed earlier that he was leading the vote for first basemen for the All-Star Game.  Ryon Healy was hit by a pitch, loading the bases.  Chapman was unable to bring in any runs, as he struck out.  The game was already running late, past eleven o’clock.  Liam Hendriks pitched the top of the tenth inning.  After a strikeout, he allowed two singles and a walk.  A fly ball out to right field gave the Yankees the lead for the first time all night at 7-6.  Hendriks struck out the next batter.  At least he allowed only one run, so the A’s still had a reasonable chance to come back.  In the bottom of the tenth inning, Vogt grounded out and Joyce struck out, so things looked bleak.  However, Rajai Davis singled and Chad Pinder doubled, giving the A’s a chance to win with another hit.  Lowrie was intentionally walked.  He was a double short of the cycle.  Khris Davis came up to bat.  The count went to 2-2 when he hit the ball that looked like it could drop beyond the second baseman, and the ball did bounce off his glove.  Two runs scored in the walk-off win.  It was a good end to a very long day.  The game started at 7:08 with a game time temperature of 75 degrees, and it ended at 11:38.  That sure was a long time for ten innings.  It seemed that pitchers spend a lot of time not pitching.  The attendance was 21,838.  I was eager to get home quickly.  It was past midnight when I caught the train home.  Some of the people who died on June 16 include George Reeves (1959), Brian Piccolo (1970), Nicholas Ray (1979), Mel Allen (1996), and Susan Tyrrell (2012).  Today is a birthday for John Cho (45), Laurie Metcalf (62), and Gino Vannelli (65).  According to the Brandon Brooks Rewind radio segment for June 16, the ant movie “Them!” had its New York premiere in 1954.  In 1965, Bob Dylan recorded “Like a Rolling Stone.”  In 1970, “Two Mules for Sister Sara” was released.  In 1980, “The Blues Brothers” had its premiere in Chicago.

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